Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613617
Title:
KETAMINE’S EFFECT ON SINGLE-UNIT ACTIVITY IN THE STRIATUM
Author:
SEGHEZZO, GIULIA FRANCESCA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ketamine is a commonly used anesthetic; however, when administered at low-dose subanesthetic levels, ketamine has been shown to relieve chronic pain and treatment-resistant depression. Recent studies have shown that sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine reduce L-DOPAinduced dyskinesia (LID), an impairment of voluntary movement, in rodent models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and in human patients. As an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NDMA) receptor antagonist, we can predict ketamine’s effects on the brain by already knowing how NMDA receptors function. Recent data from our previous experiments show how ketamine alters brain oscillations, inducing sustained high-frequency oscillations in regions such as the dorsolateral striatum. Knowing that ketamine alters oscillatory brain activity we further investigated how it affected single-unit activity in these regions. Single-unit recording measures activity of a single neuron in a desired area of the brain by measuring the rate of change in voltage during an action potential. Here we investigated how repeated exposure to ketamine alters the single-unit activity in the striatum. Results show that the isolated cells respond in a variety of ways to ketamine, some being inhibited while others were excited. Further analysis looked at variance, spiking patterns, and waveform shape to further understand ketamine’s effect on neural activity.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cowen, Stephen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleKETAMINE’S EFFECT ON SINGLE-UNIT ACTIVITY IN THE STRIATUMen_US
dc.creatorSEGHEZZO, GIULIA FRANCESCAen
dc.contributor.authorSEGHEZZO, GIULIA FRANCESCAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractKetamine is a commonly used anesthetic; however, when administered at low-dose subanesthetic levels, ketamine has been shown to relieve chronic pain and treatment-resistant depression. Recent studies have shown that sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine reduce L-DOPAinduced dyskinesia (LID), an impairment of voluntary movement, in rodent models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and in human patients. As an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NDMA) receptor antagonist, we can predict ketamine’s effects on the brain by already knowing how NMDA receptors function. Recent data from our previous experiments show how ketamine alters brain oscillations, inducing sustained high-frequency oscillations in regions such as the dorsolateral striatum. Knowing that ketamine alters oscillatory brain activity we further investigated how it affected single-unit activity in these regions. Single-unit recording measures activity of a single neuron in a desired area of the brain by measuring the rate of change in voltage during an action potential. Here we investigated how repeated exposure to ketamine alters the single-unit activity in the striatum. Results show that the isolated cells respond in a variety of ways to ketamine, some being inhibited while others were excited. Further analysis looked at variance, spiking patterns, and waveform shape to further understand ketamine’s effect on neural activity.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCowen, Stephenen
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