The Role and Function of the Notch Signaling Pathway in Early Segmentation in Tribolium castaneum

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613593
Title:
The Role and Function of the Notch Signaling Pathway in Early Segmentation in Tribolium castaneum
Author:
SEAGO, ANTHONY WILLIAM
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The way in which arthropods construct their body plans is determined by the method of segmentation that they utilize. In more ancestrally located animals on the phylogenetic tree such as Oncopeltus and Thamnocephalus, there generally seems to be an overarching use of the Notch signaling pathway in order to develop properly. However, in more evolutionarily derived organisms such as Drosophila and Tribolium, a different segmentation clock has been proposed to be solely used, termed the pair-rule oscillator. While there is some evidence that Notch signaling has no effect on the segment addition of the model organism Tribolium castaneum, there has also been data supporting the use of Notch signaling on embryonic patterning. In order to further investigate its role, RNAi of Delta, a Notch signaling protein, and in situ hybridization of Notch and Delta was performed. Multiple phenotypes such as a deformation of mouthparts, lack of midline segmentation, and abnormal head development were observed. While our results are currently inconclusive, there are promising similarities in conjunction with published data that lead us to believe that Notch signaling may, in fact, be involved in Tribolium segmentation.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nagy, Lisa M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Role and Function of the Notch Signaling Pathway in Early Segmentation in Tribolium castaneumen_US
dc.creatorSEAGO, ANTHONY WILLIAMen
dc.contributor.authorSEAGO, ANTHONY WILLIAMen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe way in which arthropods construct their body plans is determined by the method of segmentation that they utilize. In more ancestrally located animals on the phylogenetic tree such as Oncopeltus and Thamnocephalus, there generally seems to be an overarching use of the Notch signaling pathway in order to develop properly. However, in more evolutionarily derived organisms such as Drosophila and Tribolium, a different segmentation clock has been proposed to be solely used, termed the pair-rule oscillator. While there is some evidence that Notch signaling has no effect on the segment addition of the model organism Tribolium castaneum, there has also been data supporting the use of Notch signaling on embryonic patterning. In order to further investigate its role, RNAi of Delta, a Notch signaling protein, and in situ hybridization of Notch and Delta was performed. Multiple phenotypes such as a deformation of mouthparts, lack of midline segmentation, and abnormal head development were observed. While our results are currently inconclusive, there are promising similarities in conjunction with published data that lead us to believe that Notch signaling may, in fact, be involved in Tribolium segmentation.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorNagy, Lisa M.en
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