Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613587
Title:
CONTEMPLATIVE PEDAGOGY: A TEXTUAL ANALYSIS
Author:
SCHULTZ, BRITTANY DIANE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of contemplative pedagogy. Forty-four honors students completed a course in contemplative pedagogy at a western university. The focus of the course was empathy and compassion. The students partook in a variety of contemplative practices such as loving-kindness meditation, mindfulness meditation, and breath-focused meditation. Over the 15-week course, the students meditated before and after reading articles on contemplative ideas and wrote journal entries each week. The content of the journal entries was broken into categories by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) software. A variety of themes were analyzed. Self-report data separated the students into three groups; continuing-meditators, new-meditators, and non-meditators. The journal entries showed an increase in personal pronouns, future tense, causation, and religion words over the course of the semester suggesting. There was a decrease in first person singular pronouns, positive and negative emotion words, and insight. This study provides implications of the effectiveness of contemplative pedagogy and offers a basis for more research in the area.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCONTEMPLATIVE PEDAGOGY: A TEXTUAL ANALYSISen_US
dc.creatorSCHULTZ, BRITTANY DIANEen
dc.contributor.authorSCHULTZ, BRITTANY DIANEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of contemplative pedagogy. Forty-four honors students completed a course in contemplative pedagogy at a western university. The focus of the course was empathy and compassion. The students partook in a variety of contemplative practices such as loving-kindness meditation, mindfulness meditation, and breath-focused meditation. Over the 15-week course, the students meditated before and after reading articles on contemplative ideas and wrote journal entries each week. The content of the journal entries was broken into categories by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) software. A variety of themes were analyzed. Self-report data separated the students into three groups; continuing-meditators, new-meditators, and non-meditators. The journal entries showed an increase in personal pronouns, future tense, causation, and religion words over the course of the semester suggesting. There was a decrease in first person singular pronouns, positive and negative emotion words, and insight. This study provides implications of the effectiveness of contemplative pedagogy and offers a basis for more research in the area.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfreden
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