Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613583
Title:
US COVERT ACTION: SACRIFICING PRUDENCE FOR EXPEDIENCE
Author:
Rutgers, David Andrew
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The United States (US) is damaging its diplomatic efforts, international power, and public safety as results of strategically employing covert operations. In order to avoid further degradation of its international influence, the US must adhere to American democratic principles and thoughtful diplomatic relations, and abandon covert action in favor of congressionally-approved, overt military action when US interests are threatened. There is an imperative to explore the residual effects of US covert actions that make many nations hostile towards Americans and US policy objectives. Understanding the modern demand for government transparency and oversight, policymakers, diplomats, and academics must recognize that fundamental changes for conflict resolution are required to secure US strategic interests, diplomatic goals, and public safety. By employing library and archival research methodology, this thesis illuminates the damaging effects of covert action on US international relations at both the macro and micro levels. Further, research perspectives on the morality of covert action and its lasting effects on societies – domestic and foreign – are also integrated into this research. Ultimately, results are intended to approach the topic of US covert action from the unique perspectives of diplomacy and security, to include assessments of a holistic solution, previously unexplored in other academic writings.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Applied Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ochs, Krista M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUS COVERT ACTION: SACRIFICING PRUDENCE FOR EXPEDIENCEen_US
dc.creatorRutgers, David Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorRutgers, David Andrewen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe United States (US) is damaging its diplomatic efforts, international power, and public safety as results of strategically employing covert operations. In order to avoid further degradation of its international influence, the US must adhere to American democratic principles and thoughtful diplomatic relations, and abandon covert action in favor of congressionally-approved, overt military action when US interests are threatened. There is an imperative to explore the residual effects of US covert actions that make many nations hostile towards Americans and US policy objectives. Understanding the modern demand for government transparency and oversight, policymakers, diplomats, and academics must recognize that fundamental changes for conflict resolution are required to secure US strategic interests, diplomatic goals, and public safety. By employing library and archival research methodology, this thesis illuminates the damaging effects of covert action on US international relations at both the macro and micro levels. Further, research perspectives on the morality of covert action and its lasting effects on societies – domestic and foreign – are also integrated into this research. Ultimately, results are intended to approach the topic of US covert action from the unique perspectives of diplomacy and security, to include assessments of a holistic solution, previously unexplored in other academic writings.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorOchs, Krista M.en
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