Self-Talk: Effects on Emotion in Interpersonal Communication Context

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613581
Title:
Self-Talk: Effects on Emotion in Interpersonal Communication Context
Author:
Qadar, Farah
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examines self-talk within a communication framework and context. The effects of different types of self-talk on emotion are explored. Specifically, this research looks at different types of self-talk based on the language and message aspects of the self-talk including: valence of self-talk (negative vs. positive), and self-talk content (using name vs. second-person pronoun [you] for self-reference). The relative effects of these different types of self-talk on emotion are investigated within the context of interpersonal anger. For control, the study contrasts the effects of self-talk with the effects of thought. Additionally, this study looks at the effects of the different types of self-talk and thought on subsequent interpersonal communication outcomes (perceived satisfaction and effectiveness of written interpersonal communication as well as willingness to communicate interpersonally). Results indicated that valence of self-talk and thought has significant impact on emotional outcomes. Results also indicated an interaction effect between valence and the self-talk/thought manipulation on negative affect. Positive self-talk decreased negative affect more than positive thought. Further results demonstrated a mediated effect of self-talk on subsequent interpersonal communication outcomes. Positive self-talk led to less anger after interpersonal communication which led to greater perceptions of interpersonal communication effectiveness and satisfaction and increased willingness to communicate interpersonally.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Emotion; Interpersonal Communication; Intrapersonal Communication; Self-Talk; Communication; Anger
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harwood, Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSelf-Talk: Effects on Emotion in Interpersonal Communication Contexten_US
dc.creatorQadar, Farahen
dc.contributor.authorQadar, Farahen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis study examines self-talk within a communication framework and context. The effects of different types of self-talk on emotion are explored. Specifically, this research looks at different types of self-talk based on the language and message aspects of the self-talk including: valence of self-talk (negative vs. positive), and self-talk content (using name vs. second-person pronoun [you] for self-reference). The relative effects of these different types of self-talk on emotion are investigated within the context of interpersonal anger. For control, the study contrasts the effects of self-talk with the effects of thought. Additionally, this study looks at the effects of the different types of self-talk and thought on subsequent interpersonal communication outcomes (perceived satisfaction and effectiveness of written interpersonal communication as well as willingness to communicate interpersonally). Results indicated that valence of self-talk and thought has significant impact on emotional outcomes. Results also indicated an interaction effect between valence and the self-talk/thought manipulation on negative affect. Positive self-talk decreased negative affect more than positive thought. Further results demonstrated a mediated effect of self-talk on subsequent interpersonal communication outcomes. Positive self-talk led to less anger after interpersonal communication which led to greater perceptions of interpersonal communication effectiveness and satisfaction and increased willingness to communicate interpersonally.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectEmotionen
dc.subjectInterpersonal Communicationen
dc.subjectIntrapersonal Communicationen
dc.subjectSelf-Talken
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectAngeren
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorHarwood, Jakeen
dc.contributor.committeememberSegrin, Chrisen
dc.contributor.committeememberPitts, Margareten
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