Pre-Classic Hohokam Obsidian in the Tucson Basin: Examing Patterns in Procurement and Use

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613575
Title:
Pre-Classic Hohokam Obsidian in the Tucson Basin: Examing Patterns in Procurement and Use
Author:
Higgins, Richard E.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Obsidian source attribution has become an important tool in examining many aspects of prehistoric lifeways including exchange, identity, social and economic boundaries, and many others. This thesis provides a comprehensive look at obsidian spatial distributions in the Tucson Basin Hohokam Pre-Classic period, ca. A.D. 750-1150. By examining currently available data and providing new data from three sites in the northern Tucson Basin conclusions about trends in spatial and temporal use of obsidian are made. Obsidian procurement and spatial distribution in the Tucson Basin appears to be distinct from neighboring regions and continuity with later Classic period, ca. A.D. 1150-1450 obsidian use is likely. There appears to be a clear preference for western obsidian sources in the northern Tucson basin, while the southern basin may have a slight preference for materials to the east. The limited obsidian data for the Colonial period, ca. A.D. 750-950 suggests that its distribution was controlled by similar processes to those observed in the Sedentary period, ca. A.D. 950-1150. This research further suggests that strong avenues are open for future research.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Hohokam; obsidian; Pre-classic; Tucson; XRF; Anthropology; Classic
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mills, Barbara J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePre-Classic Hohokam Obsidian in the Tucson Basin: Examing Patterns in Procurement and Useen_US
dc.creatorHiggins, Richard E.en
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Richard E.en
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractObsidian source attribution has become an important tool in examining many aspects of prehistoric lifeways including exchange, identity, social and economic boundaries, and many others. This thesis provides a comprehensive look at obsidian spatial distributions in the Tucson Basin Hohokam Pre-Classic period, ca. A.D. 750-1150. By examining currently available data and providing new data from three sites in the northern Tucson Basin conclusions about trends in spatial and temporal use of obsidian are made. Obsidian procurement and spatial distribution in the Tucson Basin appears to be distinct from neighboring regions and continuity with later Classic period, ca. A.D. 1150-1450 obsidian use is likely. There appears to be a clear preference for western obsidian sources in the northern Tucson basin, while the southern basin may have a slight preference for materials to the east. The limited obsidian data for the Colonial period, ca. A.D. 750-950 suggests that its distribution was controlled by similar processes to those observed in the Sedentary period, ca. A.D. 950-1150. This research further suggests that strong avenues are open for future research.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectHohokamen
dc.subjectobsidianen
dc.subjectPre-classicen
dc.subjectTucsonen
dc.subjectXRFen
dc.subjectAnthropologyen
dc.subjectClassicen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMills, Barbara J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberElson, Mark D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTowner, Ronald H.en
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