CUTTING EDGE INNOVATION: DISSECTING THE GENETIC BASIS OF A PLANT-PIERCING OVIPOSITOR IN AN HERBIVOROUS FLY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613574
Title:
CUTTING EDGE INNOVATION: DISSECTING THE GENETIC BASIS OF A PLANT-PIERCING OVIPOSITOR IN AN HERBIVOROUS FLY
Author:
RAY, JULIANNE FLORENCE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The evolution of herbivory within an insect lineage is often enabled by novel morphological innovations. The ancestor of Scaptomyza flava developed a serrated ovipositor nearly six million years ago, associated with an evolutionary transition to herbivory, that allows these flies to cut into mustard plants deposit eggs into the wound. We aim to identify candidate genes associated with ovipositor peg development in S. flava using a genome-wide association study (GWAS). GWAS methods are only appropriate for heritable, variable traits. Dissection and photographic profiling of ovipositors from over 700 female flies revealed variation in the number of serrated pegs within natural populations. Mother-daughter profiling showed this variation was heritable (h2 = 46%). Peg number variation among individuals followed a normal distribution, suggesting multiple genes likely influence this trait. Sequencing genomes of pools of individuals with the most and fewest ovipositor pegs from two populations identified four candidate loci affecting ovipositor peg number in S. flava. Many of these loci contribute to neural development in Drosophila melanogaster, consistent with the hypothesis that ovipositor pegs are hardened, innervated bristles. Overall, this project sets the stage for understanding the genetic and developmental basis of a key evolutionary innovation – a leaf-cutting ovipositor – in herbivorous insects.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Whiteman, Noah K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCUTTING EDGE INNOVATION: DISSECTING THE GENETIC BASIS OF A PLANT-PIERCING OVIPOSITOR IN AN HERBIVOROUS FLYen_US
dc.creatorRAY, JULIANNE FLORENCEen
dc.contributor.authorRAY, JULIANNE FLORENCEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe evolution of herbivory within an insect lineage is often enabled by novel morphological innovations. The ancestor of Scaptomyza flava developed a serrated ovipositor nearly six million years ago, associated with an evolutionary transition to herbivory, that allows these flies to cut into mustard plants deposit eggs into the wound. We aim to identify candidate genes associated with ovipositor peg development in S. flava using a genome-wide association study (GWAS). GWAS methods are only appropriate for heritable, variable traits. Dissection and photographic profiling of ovipositors from over 700 female flies revealed variation in the number of serrated pegs within natural populations. Mother-daughter profiling showed this variation was heritable (h2 = 46%). Peg number variation among individuals followed a normal distribution, suggesting multiple genes likely influence this trait. Sequencing genomes of pools of individuals with the most and fewest ovipositor pegs from two populations identified four candidate loci affecting ovipositor peg number in S. flava. Many of these loci contribute to neural development in Drosophila melanogaster, consistent with the hypothesis that ovipositor pegs are hardened, innervated bristles. Overall, this project sets the stage for understanding the genetic and developmental basis of a key evolutionary innovation – a leaf-cutting ovipositor – in herbivorous insects.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWhiteman, Noah K.en
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