AN IMPROVED RESOLUTION SPATIALLY DISTRIBUTED GLOBAL SEDIMENT FLUX MODEL

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613477
Title:
AN IMPROVED RESOLUTION SPATIALLY DISTRIBUTED GLOBAL SEDIMENT FLUX MODEL
Author:
Prescott, Alexander Barrett; Pelletier, Jon
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The magnitude of a river’s sediment discharge provides insight to many ongoing processes in the upstream basin, in particular the basin-averaged erosion rate and the pace of landscape evolution. Knowledge of sediment discharge is applied in agriculture, water quality, calculating dam life expectancy, delta and alluvial fan dynamics, long-term nutrient cycling, and coastal morphology and dynamics. Few models of earth surface sediment processes have been created for the global scale. This thesis improves by a factor of 100 the resolution of a global, spatially-distributed sediment flux model developed by Pelletier (2012) that explicitly differentiates the detachment of sediment from hillslopes and the movement of sediment down-gradient via riverine transport. Using data for monthly precipitation, vegetation cover, slope, soil grain-size distribution, and two free parameters, the model replicates the sediment yield of 128 global rivers with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.73. The parameters that minimize the sum of squared residuals are c1 = 0.060 and c2=3 m s-1. Residual analysis indicates that low-magnitude sediment yields are over predicted and high magnitude sediment yields are under predicted, though this trend may be a function of errors in the routing algorithm used. Residuals are statistically independent of upstream basin area.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.; B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Environmental Hydrology and Water Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pelletier, Jon

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAN IMPROVED RESOLUTION SPATIALLY DISTRIBUTED GLOBAL SEDIMENT FLUX MODELen_US
dc.creatorPrescott, Alexander Barretten
dc.creatorPelletier, Jonen
dc.contributor.authorPrescott, Alexander Barretten
dc.contributor.authorPelletier, Jonen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe magnitude of a river’s sediment discharge provides insight to many ongoing processes in the upstream basin, in particular the basin-averaged erosion rate and the pace of landscape evolution. Knowledge of sediment discharge is applied in agriculture, water quality, calculating dam life expectancy, delta and alluvial fan dynamics, long-term nutrient cycling, and coastal morphology and dynamics. Few models of earth surface sediment processes have been created for the global scale. This thesis improves by a factor of 100 the resolution of a global, spatially-distributed sediment flux model developed by Pelletier (2012) that explicitly differentiates the detachment of sediment from hillslopes and the movement of sediment down-gradient via riverine transport. Using data for monthly precipitation, vegetation cover, slope, soil grain-size distribution, and two free parameters, the model replicates the sediment yield of 128 global rivers with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.73. The parameters that minimize the sum of squared residuals are c1 = 0.060 and c2=3 m s-1. Residual analysis indicates that low-magnitude sediment yields are over predicted and high magnitude sediment yields are under predicted, though this trend may be a function of errors in the routing algorithm used. Residuals are statistically independent of upstream basin area.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Hydrology and Water Resourcesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPelletier, Jonen
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