Person-First Language: Difficulties and Solutions with Putting People First

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613459
Title:
Person-First Language: Difficulties and Solutions with Putting People First
Author:
Primeau, Casey Anne
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Person-first language is often labeled as the gold-standard method for writing about and addressing people who have disabilities. The goal of person-first language is to put a person before their disability and emphasize other aspects of who a person is beyond their disability. This goal offers a more appropriate option in lieu of using some of the insensitive and offensive terminology that often has been used to describe individuals with disabilities. Though thought of as a neutral and respectful method of referencing individuals with disabilities, there are still many flaws and objections to its use. A different method, disability-first language, involves calling someone a “disabled person” rather than a “person with a disability.” This method of reference contends with person-first language as many people with disabilities feel that it reflects the fact that their impairment is part of who they are. Preference between person-first and disability-first language varies across disability groups. The debate remains whether people should opt to use person-first language or disability-first language. No preference has been documented yet amongst people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, but interviews conducted in this study show that person-first language might be an appropriate option to use in general with this population.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Oland, Lynne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePerson-First Language: Difficulties and Solutions with Putting People Firsten_US
dc.creatorPrimeau, Casey Anneen
dc.contributor.authorPrimeau, Casey Anneen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPerson-first language is often labeled as the gold-standard method for writing about and addressing people who have disabilities. The goal of person-first language is to put a person before their disability and emphasize other aspects of who a person is beyond their disability. This goal offers a more appropriate option in lieu of using some of the insensitive and offensive terminology that often has been used to describe individuals with disabilities. Though thought of as a neutral and respectful method of referencing individuals with disabilities, there are still many flaws and objections to its use. A different method, disability-first language, involves calling someone a “disabled person” rather than a “person with a disability.” This method of reference contends with person-first language as many people with disabilities feel that it reflects the fact that their impairment is part of who they are. Preference between person-first and disability-first language varies across disability groups. The debate remains whether people should opt to use person-first language or disability-first language. No preference has been documented yet amongst people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, but interviews conducted in this study show that person-first language might be an appropriate option to use in general with this population.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorOland, Lynneen
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