Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613422
Title:
Testing, Assessment, and Evaluation in Language Programs
Author:
Alobaid, Adnan Othman
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This three-article dissertation addresses three different yet interrelated topics: language testing, assessment, and evaluation. The first article (Saudi Student Placement into ESL Program Levels: Issues beyond Test Criteria) addresses a crucial yet understudied issue concerning why lower-level ESL classes typically contain a disproportionate number of Saudi students. Based on data obtained from different stakeholders, the findings revealed that one-third of the study students intentionally underperformed on ESL placement tests. However, ESL administrators participating in this study provided contradicting findings. The second article explores the efficacy of (Integrating Self-assessment Techniques into L2 Classroom Assessment Procedures) by examining the accuracy of CEFR self-assessment rubric compared to students' TOEFL scores, and the extent to which gender and levels of language proficiency cause any potential score underestimation. By obtaining data from 21 ESL students attending the Center for English as a Second Language at University of Arizona, the findings revealed no statistically significant correlations between participants' self-assessed scores and their TOEFL scores. However, the participants reported that the CEFR self-assessment rubric is accurate in measuring their levels of language proficiency. On the other hand, the third article (Quality Assurance and Accreditation as Forms for Language Program Evaluation: A Case Study of Two EFL Departments in A Saudi University) provides a simulated program evaluation based on an integrated set of standards of the NCAAA (the National Commission for Academic Accreditation and Assessment) and CEA (the Commission on English Language Program Accreditation). The findings indicated that the standards of the mission, curriculum, student learning outcomes, and program development, planning, and review, were partially met, whereas the standards of teaching strategies, assessment methods, and student achievement were not.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Language Testing Assessment and Evaluation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Second Language Acquisition & Teaching
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Panferov, Suzanne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTesting, Assessment, and Evaluation in Language Programsen_US
dc.creatorAlobaid, Adnan Othmanen
dc.contributor.authorAlobaid, Adnan Othmanen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis three-article dissertation addresses three different yet interrelated topics: language testing, assessment, and evaluation. The first article (Saudi Student Placement into ESL Program Levels: Issues beyond Test Criteria) addresses a crucial yet understudied issue concerning why lower-level ESL classes typically contain a disproportionate number of Saudi students. Based on data obtained from different stakeholders, the findings revealed that one-third of the study students intentionally underperformed on ESL placement tests. However, ESL administrators participating in this study provided contradicting findings. The second article explores the efficacy of (Integrating Self-assessment Techniques into L2 Classroom Assessment Procedures) by examining the accuracy of CEFR self-assessment rubric compared to students' TOEFL scores, and the extent to which gender and levels of language proficiency cause any potential score underestimation. By obtaining data from 21 ESL students attending the Center for English as a Second Language at University of Arizona, the findings revealed no statistically significant correlations between participants' self-assessed scores and their TOEFL scores. However, the participants reported that the CEFR self-assessment rubric is accurate in measuring their levels of language proficiency. On the other hand, the third article (Quality Assurance and Accreditation as Forms for Language Program Evaluation: A Case Study of Two EFL Departments in A Saudi University) provides a simulated program evaluation based on an integrated set of standards of the NCAAA (the National Commission for Academic Accreditation and Assessment) and CEA (the Commission on English Language Program Accreditation). The findings indicated that the standards of the mission, curriculum, student learning outcomes, and program development, planning, and review, were partially met, whereas the standards of teaching strategies, assessment methods, and student achievement were not.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
dc.subjectLanguage Testing Assessment and Evaluationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPanferov, Suzanneen
dc.contributor.committeememberDupuy, Beatriceen
dc.contributor.committeememberEcke, Peteren
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Edmonden
dc.contributor.committeememberPanferov, Suzanneen
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