THE INFLUENCE OF THE BEN’S BELLS KIND CAMPUS PROGRAM ON SCHOOL CLIMATE IN A SCHOOL DISTRICT IN TUCSON, ARIZONA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613421
Title:
THE INFLUENCE OF THE BEN’S BELLS KIND CAMPUS PROGRAM ON SCHOOL CLIMATE IN A SCHOOL DISTRICT IN TUCSON, ARIZONA
Author:
PETTMAN, ANDRÉ
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Preliminary qualitative research has suggested that participants find the Ben’s Bells Kind Campus Program to be effective in promoting kindness and reducing negative school climate, but this has not been examined quantitatively. The purpose of the present study is to examine the influence of the Kind Campus Program on school climate in a school district in Tucson, Arizona. It is predicted that there will be an association between the Kind Campus Program and school climate. Data for this study were collected from surveys distributed to teachers and students in the school district. Variables encapsulating positive and negative school climate and dosage were created from statements from these surveys. Analyses were conducted on the relationships between these variables to determine the level of influence of Kind Campus on school climate. Results demonstrate a positive correlation between Kind Campus and positive school climate, and a negative correlation with negative school climate. Implications of the current study include a greater understanding of how Kind Campus is associated with school climate and what aspects of the program have the greatest possible relationship with school climate. Future research possibilities include administering surveys throughout the school year to acquire longitudinal data and including observational data in the analysis.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Walsh, Michele

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTHE INFLUENCE OF THE BEN’S BELLS KIND CAMPUS PROGRAM ON SCHOOL CLIMATE IN A SCHOOL DISTRICT IN TUCSON, ARIZONAen_US
dc.creatorPETTMAN, ANDRÉen
dc.contributor.authorPETTMAN, ANDRÉen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPreliminary qualitative research has suggested that participants find the Ben’s Bells Kind Campus Program to be effective in promoting kindness and reducing negative school climate, but this has not been examined quantitatively. The purpose of the present study is to examine the influence of the Kind Campus Program on school climate in a school district in Tucson, Arizona. It is predicted that there will be an association between the Kind Campus Program and school climate. Data for this study were collected from surveys distributed to teachers and students in the school district. Variables encapsulating positive and negative school climate and dosage were created from statements from these surveys. Analyses were conducted on the relationships between these variables to determine the level of influence of Kind Campus on school climate. Results demonstrate a positive correlation between Kind Campus and positive school climate, and a negative correlation with negative school climate. Implications of the current study include a greater understanding of how Kind Campus is associated with school climate and what aspects of the program have the greatest possible relationship with school climate. Future research possibilities include administering surveys throughout the school year to acquire longitudinal data and including observational data in the analysis.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWalsh, Micheleen
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