Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613415
Title:
KNEE INJURIES IN FEMALE SOCCER PLAYERS: A FOCUS ON THE ACL
Author:
PEÑA, VANESSA NICOLE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Knee injuries are extremely prevalent in high pivoting sports such as soccer, with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries being the most common. Female athletes are up to eight times more likely to experience ACL injuries compared to males. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible reasons why females are so much more likely to experience ACL injuries and identify methods which can be used to prevent such injuries. A review of textbooks and articles regarding the anatomy and biomechanics of the knee was conducted followed by a review of articles on the topic of anatomical, biomechanical, neuromuscular, and hormonal differences between males and females. This investigation identified multiple risk factors under each category which place females at an increased risk of ACL tear. A later review of the diagnosis and treatment showed that ACL injuries are the most well understood of the major ligament tears which occur in the knee. Treatment options include non-operative methods and surgical methods, depending on the patient and extent of the injury. Finally, a review of the literature regarding prevention programs demonstrated that it is possible to decrease the risk of ACL injury in females through neuromuscular and biomechanical training.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stanescu, Claudia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleKNEE INJURIES IN FEMALE SOCCER PLAYERS: A FOCUS ON THE ACLen_US
dc.creatorPEÑA, VANESSA NICOLEen
dc.contributor.authorPEÑA, VANESSA NICOLEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractKnee injuries are extremely prevalent in high pivoting sports such as soccer, with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries being the most common. Female athletes are up to eight times more likely to experience ACL injuries compared to males. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible reasons why females are so much more likely to experience ACL injuries and identify methods which can be used to prevent such injuries. A review of textbooks and articles regarding the anatomy and biomechanics of the knee was conducted followed by a review of articles on the topic of anatomical, biomechanical, neuromuscular, and hormonal differences between males and females. This investigation identified multiple risk factors under each category which place females at an increased risk of ACL tear. A later review of the diagnosis and treatment showed that ACL injuries are the most well understood of the major ligament tears which occur in the knee. Treatment options include non-operative methods and surgical methods, depending on the patient and extent of the injury. Finally, a review of the literature regarding prevention programs demonstrated that it is possible to decrease the risk of ACL injury in females through neuromuscular and biomechanical training.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorStanescu, Claudiaen
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