Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613393
Title:
Telemetry Simulation Using Direct Digital Synthesis Techniques
Author:
Pitchford, Randall S.
Affiliation:
Frontier Engineering, Inc.
Issue Date:
1990-11
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Direct digital synthesis technology has been employed in the development of a telemetry data simulator constructed for the Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC). The telemetry simulator, known as TDVS II, is briefly described to provide background; however, the principal subject is related to the development of programmable synthesizer modules employed in the TDVS II system. The programmable synthesizer modules (or PSMs) utilize direct digital synthesizer (DDS) technology to generate a variety of common telemetry signals for simulation output. The internal behavior of DDS devices has been thoroughly examined in the literature for nearly 20 years. The author is aware of significant work in this area by every major aerospace contractor, as well as a broad range of activity by semiconductor developers, and in the universities. The purpose here is to expand awareness of the subject and its basic concepts in support of applications for the telemetry industry. During the TDVS II application development period, new DDS devices have appeared and several advances in device technology (in terms of both speed and technique) have been effected. Many fundamental communications technologies will move into greater capacity and offer new capabilities over the next few years as a direct result of DDS technology. Among these are: cellular telephony, high-definition television and video delivery systems in general, data communications down to the general business facsimile and home modem level, and other communications systems of various types to include telemetry systems. A recent literature search of the topic, limited only to documents available in English, indicates that some 25 articles and dissertations of significance have appeared since 1985, with over 30% of these appearing in international forums (including Germany, Japan, Great Britain, Portugal, Finland...). Product advertisements can readily be found in various publications on test instruments, amateur radio, etc., which indicate that international knowledge and product application of the technology is becoming increasingly widespread.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTelemetry Simulation Using Direct Digital Synthesis Techniquesen_US
dc.contributor.authorPitchford, Randall S.en
dc.contributor.departmentFrontier Engineering, Inc.en
dc.date.issued1990-11-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractDirect digital synthesis technology has been employed in the development of a telemetry data simulator constructed for the Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC). The telemetry simulator, known as TDVS II, is briefly described to provide background; however, the principal subject is related to the development of programmable synthesizer modules employed in the TDVS II system. The programmable synthesizer modules (or PSMs) utilize direct digital synthesizer (DDS) technology to generate a variety of common telemetry signals for simulation output. The internal behavior of DDS devices has been thoroughly examined in the literature for nearly 20 years. The author is aware of significant work in this area by every major aerospace contractor, as well as a broad range of activity by semiconductor developers, and in the universities. The purpose here is to expand awareness of the subject and its basic concepts in support of applications for the telemetry industry. During the TDVS II application development period, new DDS devices have appeared and several advances in device technology (in terms of both speed and technique) have been effected. Many fundamental communications technologies will move into greater capacity and offer new capabilities over the next few years as a direct result of DDS technology. Among these are: cellular telephony, high-definition television and video delivery systems in general, data communications down to the general business facsimile and home modem level, and other communications systems of various types to include telemetry systems. A recent literature search of the topic, limited only to documents available in English, indicates that some 25 articles and dissertations of significance have appeared since 1985, with over 30% of these appearing in international forums (including Germany, Japan, Great Britain, Portugal, Finland...). Product advertisements can readily be found in various publications on test instruments, amateur radio, etc., which indicate that international knowledge and product application of the technology is becoming increasingly widespread.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613393-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.