UNCOVERING ARIZONA’S CHILDHOOD: A HISTORY OF CHILDREN IN TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY ARIZONA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613389
Title:
UNCOVERING ARIZONA’S CHILDHOOD: A HISTORY OF CHILDREN IN TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY ARIZONA
Author:
PEIFFER, REBECCA TESS
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project seeks to understand the cultural complexities of life in Arizona from 1900-1920 from the perspective of the children that grew up during this time. Children reflect the societal norms of their time, yet also change and add to existing cultural practices as they develop. Their interactions with the unique culture of Arizona reveals a great deal about the specific ways culture changed and developed over this period. Various history classes and supplemental research provide context for this period in Arizonan history. Borderlands theory helps tie together seemingly disparate cultural threads from the archives. Memoirs of children and students from different cultural groups give children a voice in the story, while other sources that discuss children provide background on the views of children during this period. This study reveals that though Anglo culture dominated during this period, this required white community leaders to actively push against the natural blending of culture throughout the region, occurring in large part due to the mixed cultural upbringing of children.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Steptoe, Tyina

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUNCOVERING ARIZONA’S CHILDHOOD: A HISTORY OF CHILDREN IN TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY ARIZONAen_US
dc.creatorPEIFFER, REBECCA TESSen
dc.contributor.authorPEIFFER, REBECCA TESSen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis project seeks to understand the cultural complexities of life in Arizona from 1900-1920 from the perspective of the children that grew up during this time. Children reflect the societal norms of their time, yet also change and add to existing cultural practices as they develop. Their interactions with the unique culture of Arizona reveals a great deal about the specific ways culture changed and developed over this period. Various history classes and supplemental research provide context for this period in Arizonan history. Borderlands theory helps tie together seemingly disparate cultural threads from the archives. Memoirs of children and students from different cultural groups give children a voice in the story, while other sources that discuss children provide background on the views of children during this period. This study reveals that though Anglo culture dominated during this period, this required white community leaders to actively push against the natural blending of culture throughout the region, occurring in large part due to the mixed cultural upbringing of children.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSteptoe, Tyinaen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.