Digital Divide 3.0: The Mobile Revolution, Smartphone Use, and the Emerging Device Gap

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613388
Title:
Digital Divide 3.0: The Mobile Revolution, Smartphone Use, and the Emerging Device Gap
Author:
Tsetsi, Eric Lawrence
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Digital divide research has recently begun to address the functional gaps between Internet-connected technologies, specifically mobile and wired devices. This study uses nationally representative survey data from the Pew Internet and American Life Project to address this area of research and explores how smartphone-dependence compared to multi-modal access impacts Internet use among key demographic groups including race, sex, age, income, and education. This study also explores how demographic characteristics and smartphone use interact to affect reliance on smartphones and perceptions of the utility of mobile devices. Results show that race, sex, age, income, and education, exhibit different rates of smartphone-dependence, and also perform different online activities with their smartphones. Minorities and younger users are more likely to be smartphone-dependent and multi-modal users suggesting that these demographic groups are adopting mobile Internet technologies faster than Whites and older individuals. Minorities also use smartphones for more news and information activities than Whites, which contradicts traditional usage gap predictions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
digital divide; mobile technology; smartphone; social diversification; usage gap; Communication; device gap
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rains, Stephen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDigital Divide 3.0: The Mobile Revolution, Smartphone Use, and the Emerging Device Gapen_US
dc.creatorTsetsi, Eric Lawrenceen
dc.contributor.authorTsetsi, Eric Lawrenceen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDigital divide research has recently begun to address the functional gaps between Internet-connected technologies, specifically mobile and wired devices. This study uses nationally representative survey data from the Pew Internet and American Life Project to address this area of research and explores how smartphone-dependence compared to multi-modal access impacts Internet use among key demographic groups including race, sex, age, income, and education. This study also explores how demographic characteristics and smartphone use interact to affect reliance on smartphones and perceptions of the utility of mobile devices. Results show that race, sex, age, income, and education, exhibit different rates of smartphone-dependence, and also perform different online activities with their smartphones. Minorities and younger users are more likely to be smartphone-dependent and multi-modal users suggesting that these demographic groups are adopting mobile Internet technologies faster than Whites and older individuals. Minorities also use smartphones for more news and information activities than Whites, which contradicts traditional usage gap predictions.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectdigital divideen
dc.subjectmobile technologyen
dc.subjectsmartphoneen
dc.subjectsocial diversificationen
dc.subjectusage gapen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectdevice gapen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRains, Stephenen
dc.contributor.committeememberHarwood, Jakeen
dc.contributor.committeememberKenski, Kateen
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