The Future of Myasthenia Gravis: Exploring the Onset, Progression and Implications of Disease

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613371
Title:
The Future of Myasthenia Gravis: Exploring the Onset, Progression and Implications of Disease
Author:
Paluszcyk, Chana Renee
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease whose name means "grave muscular weakness". MG is a rare disease affecting only 200-400 persons per million and the characteristic symptoms include muscle weakness, particularly in highly active voluntary muscles. MG affects the neuromuscular junction in an antibody-mediated manner, resulting in impaired nerve-muscle cell communication in affected individuals. Specifically, two main proteins are targeted: nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (ACh receptors) and a muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Previous studies have discovered the mechanism of MG pathogenesis but the exact mechanisms which cause the failure to maintain self-tolerance have not been discovered. Based on current knowledge of MG, this paper will explore potential causes of the disease and provide numerous hypotheses directed at future research opportunities.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Complement system; Myasthenia gravis; nicotinic acetylcholine receptor; Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Autoimmune
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wilson, Jean

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Future of Myasthenia Gravis: Exploring the Onset, Progression and Implications of Diseaseen_US
dc.creatorPaluszcyk, Chana Reneeen
dc.contributor.authorPaluszcyk, Chana Reneeen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMyasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease whose name means "grave muscular weakness". MG is a rare disease affecting only 200-400 persons per million and the characteristic symptoms include muscle weakness, particularly in highly active voluntary muscles. MG affects the neuromuscular junction in an antibody-mediated manner, resulting in impaired nerve-muscle cell communication in affected individuals. Specifically, two main proteins are targeted: nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (ACh receptors) and a muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Previous studies have discovered the mechanism of MG pathogenesis but the exact mechanisms which cause the failure to maintain self-tolerance have not been discovered. Based on current knowledge of MG, this paper will explore potential causes of the disease and provide numerous hypotheses directed at future research opportunities.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectComplement systemen
dc.subjectMyasthenia gravisen
dc.subjectnicotinic acetylcholine receptoren
dc.subjectCellular and Molecular Medicineen
dc.subjectAutoimmuneen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCellular and Molecular Medicineen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Jeanen
dc.contributor.committeememberElliott, Daviden
dc.contributor.committeememberLybarger, Lonnieen
dc.contributor.committeememberRiggs, Michaelen
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