Interaction of PfEMP1 with the Human Immune System and the Prospect of PfEMP1-based Vaccine for Malaria

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613366
Title:
Interaction of PfEMP1 with the Human Immune System and the Prospect of PfEMP1-based Vaccine for Malaria
Author:
Magale, Hussein Issak
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Malaria is a leading cause of death in some developing countries. The malaria parasite has been around for over a century, and has coevolved with humans. Coming up with an effective vaccine for P. falciparum will save millions of lives and reduce the morbidity and mortality of malaria globally. Understanding the role of exported parasite proteins i.e PfEMP1 a virulence factor and major cause of malarial pathogenesis, has been of great interest to vaccine researchers in the last decade. The focus of this review is to provide a literature review on PfEMP1s, their interaction with the human immune system, and their role in helping P. falciparum parasite to evade the immune system. This review will primarily focus on the intra-erythrocytic stage, which is the stage that results in the symptoms of malaria. A review is necessary to understand the antigenic variation of PfEMP1s, and how PfEMP1s challenge the different arms of the immune response, both the innate and adaptive. This review is unique in touching on the major parts of the immune system's interaction with the PfEMP1 antigen. Furthermore, the review explores the discussion of future research and therapeutic opportunities based on our knowledge of PfEMP1 antigens.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Innate immunity; Malaria; PfEMP1; Plasmodium falciparum; Vaccine development; Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Adaptive immunity
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
St. John, Paul; Elliott, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInteraction of PfEMP1 with the Human Immune System and the Prospect of PfEMP1-based Vaccine for Malariaen_US
dc.creatorMagale, Hussein Issaken
dc.contributor.authorMagale, Hussein Issaken
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMalaria is a leading cause of death in some developing countries. The malaria parasite has been around for over a century, and has coevolved with humans. Coming up with an effective vaccine for P. falciparum will save millions of lives and reduce the morbidity and mortality of malaria globally. Understanding the role of exported parasite proteins i.e PfEMP1 a virulence factor and major cause of malarial pathogenesis, has been of great interest to vaccine researchers in the last decade. The focus of this review is to provide a literature review on PfEMP1s, their interaction with the human immune system, and their role in helping P. falciparum parasite to evade the immune system. This review will primarily focus on the intra-erythrocytic stage, which is the stage that results in the symptoms of malaria. A review is necessary to understand the antigenic variation of PfEMP1s, and how PfEMP1s challenge the different arms of the immune response, both the innate and adaptive. This review is unique in touching on the major parts of the immune system's interaction with the PfEMP1 antigen. Furthermore, the review explores the discussion of future research and therapeutic opportunities based on our knowledge of PfEMP1 antigens.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectInnate immunityen
dc.subjectMalariaen
dc.subjectPfEMP1en
dc.subjectPlasmodium falciparumen
dc.subjectVaccine developmenten
dc.subjectCellular and Molecular Medicineen
dc.subjectAdaptive immunityen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCellular and Molecular Medicineen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSt. John, Paulen
dc.contributor.advisorElliott, Daviden
dc.contributor.committeememberLybarger, Lonnieen
dc.contributor.committeememberErnst, Kaceyen
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