From Field to Home: Assessing Air Infiltration and Soil Track-in Transport Pathways of Agricultural Pesticides into Farmworkers' Home and Identifying Risk Factors for Increased In-Home Pesticide Levels

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613364
Title:
From Field to Home: Assessing Air Infiltration and Soil Track-in Transport Pathways of Agricultural Pesticides into Farmworkers' Home and Identifying Risk Factors for Increased In-Home Pesticide Levels
Author:
Sugeng, Anastasia Julia
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Farmworkers and their families may experience increased levels of agricultural pesticides in their homes due to both (1) take-home/soil track-in on shoes, clothes and skin, and (2) air infiltration from nearby agriculture fields via agricultural pesticide drift in the vapor phase or adhered to resuspended soil particles. This dissertation estimates the relative contributions o the take-home/soil track-in and air infiltration pathways of agricultural pesticides into homes, as well as identifies the risk factors for increased in-home agricultural pesticide levels for farmworkers and their families living near agriculture fields. Samples of outdoor air, yard soil, and house dust from 21 farmworkers' homes in Yuma County, Arizona were collected and analyzed for a suite of agricultural pesticides. To capture household information, such as behaviors, demographics, and housing structure, a participant questionnaire was administered at the time of the sampling. A pesticide transport model was developed, evaluated, and applied to quantify relative contributions of the air infiltration and the take-home/soil track-in pathways of agricultural pesticides into the house dust of the farmworkers' homes. To explore a wide-range of potential risk factors for increased agricultural pesticide levels in the homes, traditional statistical methods and Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analyses were used. The results of this study, found that the air infiltration pathway contributes to over 90% of some agricultural pesticides in the house dust found in the farmworkers' homes. In addition, among the influential risk factors for increased in-home agricultural pesticide levels was the home being a closer distance to an agricultural field, as well as the home having carpeted floors, more farmworkers per square footage of the home, and less months of heating and cooling the home. It is suggested that future intervention efforts to reduce in-home agricultural pesticide levels put more emphasis on targeting the air infiltration pathway, and take into consideration relevant risk factors for increased pesticide levels in the home.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
air infiltration; CART; house dust; pesticide transport model; transport pathways; Environmental Health Sciences; agricultural pesticides
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Environmental Health Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beamer, Paloma I.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFrom Field to Home: Assessing Air Infiltration and Soil Track-in Transport Pathways of Agricultural Pesticides into Farmworkers' Home and Identifying Risk Factors for Increased In-Home Pesticide Levelsen_US
dc.creatorSugeng, Anastasia Juliaen
dc.contributor.authorSugeng, Anastasia Juliaen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractFarmworkers and their families may experience increased levels of agricultural pesticides in their homes due to both (1) take-home/soil track-in on shoes, clothes and skin, and (2) air infiltration from nearby agriculture fields via agricultural pesticide drift in the vapor phase or adhered to resuspended soil particles. This dissertation estimates the relative contributions o the take-home/soil track-in and air infiltration pathways of agricultural pesticides into homes, as well as identifies the risk factors for increased in-home agricultural pesticide levels for farmworkers and their families living near agriculture fields. Samples of outdoor air, yard soil, and house dust from 21 farmworkers' homes in Yuma County, Arizona were collected and analyzed for a suite of agricultural pesticides. To capture household information, such as behaviors, demographics, and housing structure, a participant questionnaire was administered at the time of the sampling. A pesticide transport model was developed, evaluated, and applied to quantify relative contributions of the air infiltration and the take-home/soil track-in pathways of agricultural pesticides into the house dust of the farmworkers' homes. To explore a wide-range of potential risk factors for increased agricultural pesticide levels in the homes, traditional statistical methods and Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analyses were used. The results of this study, found that the air infiltration pathway contributes to over 90% of some agricultural pesticides in the house dust found in the farmworkers' homes. In addition, among the influential risk factors for increased in-home agricultural pesticide levels was the home being a closer distance to an agricultural field, as well as the home having carpeted floors, more farmworkers per square footage of the home, and less months of heating and cooling the home. It is suggested that future intervention efforts to reduce in-home agricultural pesticide levels put more emphasis on targeting the air infiltration pathway, and take into consideration relevant risk factors for increased pesticide levels in the home.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectair infiltrationen
dc.subjectCARTen
dc.subjecthouse dusten
dc.subjectpesticide transport modelen
dc.subjecttransport pathwaysen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectagricultural pesticidesen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Health Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBeamer, Paloma I.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCanales, Roberten
dc.contributor.committeememberLutz, Ericen
dc.contributor.committeememberRosales, Ceciliaen
dc.contributor.committeememberBeamer, Paloma I.en
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