The University Experiences of Post-9/11 Native American Veterans: Strategic Support For Inclusion, Retention, & Success

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613351
Title:
The University Experiences of Post-9/11 Native American Veterans: Strategic Support For Inclusion, Retention, & Success
Author:
Redhouse, Gregory Ivan
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research examines the manifold forms of support that shape and influence Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans to enter, persist, and graduate from a mainstream institution of higher education. Moreover, it is a qualitative assessment that explores how Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans navigate the collegiate environment and balance their military and indigenous identities within the context of higher education. Through the individual voices of five Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans, the results of this study illustrate their decision-making processes, weighing of options, and reasons for sacrifice. Each individual had unique experiences, situations, and circumstances to consider before committing and transitioning into higher education. The confluences of situations and circumstances often determine the ability of Native American Student Veterans to engage, persist, and complete their academic endeavors; therefore, support systems are vital in helping them navigate and overcome obstacles. Respectfully, the experiences of Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans have the power to influence future generations and to clarify their options when transitioning from a military environment to a university environment. Moreover, the findings from these experiences can inform mainstream universities and Student Veteran Centers to strategically respond and develop support systems specifically designed to recruit, retain, and graduate Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Native; Post-911; Student; Transculturation; Veterans; American Indian Studies; American
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tippeconnic-Fox, Mary Jo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe University Experiences of Post-9/11 Native American Veterans: Strategic Support For Inclusion, Retention, & Successen_US
dc.creatorRedhouse, Gregory Ivanen
dc.contributor.authorRedhouse, Gregory Ivanen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis research examines the manifold forms of support that shape and influence Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans to enter, persist, and graduate from a mainstream institution of higher education. Moreover, it is a qualitative assessment that explores how Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans navigate the collegiate environment and balance their military and indigenous identities within the context of higher education. Through the individual voices of five Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans, the results of this study illustrate their decision-making processes, weighing of options, and reasons for sacrifice. Each individual had unique experiences, situations, and circumstances to consider before committing and transitioning into higher education. The confluences of situations and circumstances often determine the ability of Native American Student Veterans to engage, persist, and complete their academic endeavors; therefore, support systems are vital in helping them navigate and overcome obstacles. Respectfully, the experiences of Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans have the power to influence future generations and to clarify their options when transitioning from a military environment to a university environment. Moreover, the findings from these experiences can inform mainstream universities and Student Veteran Centers to strategically respond and develop support systems specifically designed to recruit, retain, and graduate Post-9/11 Native American Student Veterans.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectNativeen
dc.subjectPost-911en
dc.subjectStudenten
dc.subjectTransculturationen
dc.subjectVeteransen
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen
dc.subjectAmericanen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen
dc.contributor.committeememberLuna-Firebaugh, Eileenen
dc.contributor.committeememberKraus, Amandaen
dc.contributor.committeememberTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen
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