ACTIVATION PATTERNS OF THE IEG ARC IN RATS FOLLOWING ELECTROCONVULSIVE SHOCK TREATMENTS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613350
Title:
ACTIVATION PATTERNS OF THE IEG ARC IN RATS FOLLOWING ELECTROCONVULSIVE SHOCK TREATMENTS.
Author:
NGUYEN, CHRISTIE JENNY
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The immediate early gene Arc is rapidly expressed in hippocampal subregions following excitatory neuronal activity including electroconvulsive shock treatments. Arc has been shown to play a role in synaptic plasticity and gaining insight into its regulation and mechanisms is critical to understanding the intricacies of learning and memory. This study aims to see if reducing the current of the electroconvulsive shock treatments will reduce the number of Arc mRNA-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and CA1 to further understand Arc’s role in the hippocampus. Fischer 344 (F344) rats were assigned to six different treatments: 0 mA, 20 mA, 40 mA, 65 mA, 77 mA, and 85 mA. The brains were extracted five minutes after the treatment, quick frozen, sectioned, and thaw mounted onto super frost slides. The number of Arc mRNA-positive cells were counted using compartmental analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) combined with confocal microscopy in the dentate gyrus and CA1. This revealed a sharp increase in the number of Arc mRNA-positive cells between the 65 mA counts and the 77 mA counts in the dentate gyrus (~2.8% of cells to ~85% of cells) and CA1 (distal ~27.4% of cells to ~70.1% of cells, medial ~26% of cells to 71% of cells, proximal ~17.4% of cells to 72.1% of cells) suggesting a threshold for activation.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biochemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnes, Carol A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleACTIVATION PATTERNS OF THE IEG ARC IN RATS FOLLOWING ELECTROCONVULSIVE SHOCK TREATMENTS.en_US
dc.creatorNGUYEN, CHRISTIE JENNYen
dc.contributor.authorNGUYEN, CHRISTIE JENNYen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe immediate early gene Arc is rapidly expressed in hippocampal subregions following excitatory neuronal activity including electroconvulsive shock treatments. Arc has been shown to play a role in synaptic plasticity and gaining insight into its regulation and mechanisms is critical to understanding the intricacies of learning and memory. This study aims to see if reducing the current of the electroconvulsive shock treatments will reduce the number of Arc mRNA-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and CA1 to further understand Arc’s role in the hippocampus. Fischer 344 (F344) rats were assigned to six different treatments: 0 mA, 20 mA, 40 mA, 65 mA, 77 mA, and 85 mA. The brains were extracted five minutes after the treatment, quick frozen, sectioned, and thaw mounted onto super frost slides. The number of Arc mRNA-positive cells were counted using compartmental analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) combined with confocal microscopy in the dentate gyrus and CA1. This revealed a sharp increase in the number of Arc mRNA-positive cells between the 65 mA counts and the 77 mA counts in the dentate gyrus (~2.8% of cells to ~85% of cells) and CA1 (distal ~27.4% of cells to ~70.1% of cells, medial ~26% of cells to 71% of cells, proximal ~17.4% of cells to 72.1% of cells) suggesting a threshold for activation.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBarnes, Carol A.en
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