NEURAL CORRELATES OF CONNECTED SPEECH DEFICITS AFTER LEFT HEMISPHERE RESECTIVE SURGERY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613288
Title:
NEURAL CORRELATES OF CONNECTED SPEECH DEFICITS AFTER LEFT HEMISPHERE RESECTIVE SURGERY
Author:
MCCARRON, ANGELICA RAE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Transient aphasias are very common in patients during the acute days following neurosurgical resection in the language-dominant hemisphere. This study used quantitative analysis of connected speech to characterize the incidence and nature of these aphasias, to assess their recovery over time, and to determine whether there are systematic relationships between the location of surgical resection and specific deficits in various language domains. A cohort of 114 patients underwent neurosurgical resection in the language-dominant hemisphere. Language was evaluated by means of standardized assessment and connected speech elicitation prior to surgery, 2-3 days post-surgery and 1 month post-surgery. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was used to elucidate any relationships between site of lesion and the specific language deficits identified by the connected speech analysis. High proportions of closed class words were associated with resections of the left middle and inferior temporal gyrus. Low proportions of closed class words were associated with resections of the left inferior frontal gyrus. Most language deficits observed 2-3 days post-surgery resolved by 1 month post-surgery. However, still present at one month were disruptions to fluency (including increased incidence of retracings and false starts),lexical access impairments, and speech sound errors (including increased incidence of phonological errors and distortions). These findings demonstrate that transient aphasias generally resolve within one month post-surgery. However, subtle language deficits left undetected by standardized language assessments sometimes persist beyond 1 month post-surgery.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wilson, Stephen M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNEURAL CORRELATES OF CONNECTED SPEECH DEFICITS AFTER LEFT HEMISPHERE RESECTIVE SURGERYen_US
dc.creatorMCCARRON, ANGELICA RAEen
dc.contributor.authorMCCARRON, ANGELICA RAEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractTransient aphasias are very common in patients during the acute days following neurosurgical resection in the language-dominant hemisphere. This study used quantitative analysis of connected speech to characterize the incidence and nature of these aphasias, to assess their recovery over time, and to determine whether there are systematic relationships between the location of surgical resection and specific deficits in various language domains. A cohort of 114 patients underwent neurosurgical resection in the language-dominant hemisphere. Language was evaluated by means of standardized assessment and connected speech elicitation prior to surgery, 2-3 days post-surgery and 1 month post-surgery. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was used to elucidate any relationships between site of lesion and the specific language deficits identified by the connected speech analysis. High proportions of closed class words were associated with resections of the left middle and inferior temporal gyrus. Low proportions of closed class words were associated with resections of the left inferior frontal gyrus. Most language deficits observed 2-3 days post-surgery resolved by 1 month post-surgery. However, still present at one month were disruptions to fluency (including increased incidence of retracings and false starts),lexical access impairments, and speech sound errors (including increased incidence of phonological errors and distortions). These findings demonstrate that transient aphasias generally resolve within one month post-surgery. However, subtle language deficits left undetected by standardized language assessments sometimes persist beyond 1 month post-surgery.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Stephen M.en
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