FEMINIST INTERPRETATIONS OF MIGRATION: A SOUTHERN ARIZONA CASE STUDY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613279
Title:
FEMINIST INTERPRETATIONS OF MIGRATION: A SOUTHERN ARIZONA CASE STUDY
Author:
MANRIQUEZ, MARIANA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There is a tendency in academic literature regarding Mexican migration to the United States, to refer to migrants solely as workers hoping for economic mobility, and denying any other form of subjectivity. Furthermore, scholars who deal with the Mexican diaspora in the United States offer accounts that refer to simplistic one-­‐way processes of assimilation, denying how Mexicans and Mexican-­‐Americans are involved in establishing binational and bicultural spaces of expression and survival. To addresses these limitations, feminist scholars offer powerful analytical tools to explore the ways in which migrant subjects are involved in the management of their identities through the creation of symbolic and material (socio-­‐cultural, political and economic) linkages that transcend national boundaries. This study draws on the theoretical frameworks provided by Patricia Zavella (2011), Gloria Anzaldua (1987) and V. Spike Peterson (2010), to describe the migratory experience of five women who emigrated from Mexico to the United States between the years of 1977 to 2004 and now reside in Southern Arizona. Furthermore, this study links an overall increase in Mexican migration to the United States to the (re)structuring of the global political economy through neoliberal policies.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science; International Relations
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Peterson, V. Spike

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFEMINIST INTERPRETATIONS OF MIGRATION: A SOUTHERN ARIZONA CASE STUDYen_US
dc.creatorMANRIQUEZ, MARIANAen
dc.contributor.authorMANRIQUEZ, MARIANAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThere is a tendency in academic literature regarding Mexican migration to the United States, to refer to migrants solely as workers hoping for economic mobility, and denying any other form of subjectivity. Furthermore, scholars who deal with the Mexican diaspora in the United States offer accounts that refer to simplistic one-­‐way processes of assimilation, denying how Mexicans and Mexican-­‐Americans are involved in establishing binational and bicultural spaces of expression and survival. To addresses these limitations, feminist scholars offer powerful analytical tools to explore the ways in which migrant subjects are involved in the management of their identities through the creation of symbolic and material (socio-­‐cultural, political and economic) linkages that transcend national boundaries. This study draws on the theoretical frameworks provided by Patricia Zavella (2011), Gloria Anzaldua (1987) and V. Spike Peterson (2010), to describe the migratory experience of five women who emigrated from Mexico to the United States between the years of 1977 to 2004 and now reside in Southern Arizona. Furthermore, this study links an overall increase in Mexican migration to the United States to the (re)structuring of the global political economy through neoliberal policies.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Relationsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, V. Spikeen
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