Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613256
Title:
INDUSTRIAL SCALE PRODUCTION OF SELF-HEALING CONCRETE
Author:
Lopez, Paola Andrea; Reynolds, Katherine; Sedgwick, Sarina; Wilkening, Jean
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
When exposed to varying temperatures, water, and stress, concrete develops tiny undetectable cracks that can spread and threaten its integrity until eventually it must be replaced. Self-healing concrete offers significant economic and environmental benefits. The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using bacteria as a self-healing additive, and to design a plant for producing self-healing concrete. The concrete designed by the team includes dormant bacteria that are reactivated by water entering a crack. The bacteria naturally produce calcium carbonate, which seals the cracks resulting in a stronger, longer-lasting concrete. The team designed a system of bioreactors to cultivate the bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, which is added to lightweight aggregate, a component of concrete. The team also designed a plant to produce the cement necessary to make concrete. This design involves balancing the energy needs of several large crushers and grinders, a heating and cooling system, and a large kiln. The cement and aggregate are combined with water to form self-healing concrete.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Chemical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ogden, Kimberly

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleINDUSTRIAL SCALE PRODUCTION OF SELF-HEALING CONCRETEen_US
dc.creatorLopez, Paola Andreaen
dc.creatorReynolds, Katherineen
dc.creatorSedgwick, Sarinaen
dc.creatorWilkening, Jeanen
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Paola Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Katherineen
dc.contributor.authorSedgwick, Sarinaen
dc.contributor.authorWilkening, Jeanen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractWhen exposed to varying temperatures, water, and stress, concrete develops tiny undetectable cracks that can spread and threaten its integrity until eventually it must be replaced. Self-healing concrete offers significant economic and environmental benefits. The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using bacteria as a self-healing additive, and to design a plant for producing self-healing concrete. The concrete designed by the team includes dormant bacteria that are reactivated by water entering a crack. The bacteria naturally produce calcium carbonate, which seals the cracks resulting in a stronger, longer-lasting concrete. The team designed a system of bioreactors to cultivate the bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, which is added to lightweight aggregate, a component of concrete. The team also designed a plant to produce the cement necessary to make concrete. This design involves balancing the energy needs of several large crushers and grinders, a heating and cooling system, and a large kiln. The cement and aggregate are combined with water to form self-healing concrete.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorOgden, Kimberlyen
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