Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613240
Title:
EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL ULTRASOUND (‘TUS’) ON WORKING MEMORY
Author:
Lazar, Michael Phillip
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous literature has demonstrated the ability of TMS and tDCS to modulate prefrontal networks involved in verbal working memory and produce improvements on verbal working memory tasks. The goal of this study was to attempt to recreate these results using a novel form of non-invasive brain stimulation that uses transcranial ultrasound (TUS) to modulate neural networks. In this study 20 participants were trained on the 3-back task, a version of the n-back task, and 11 received sham stimulation while the other 9 received active stimulation to the left Dorsoal Lateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC). Subjects then completed the 3-back task right after stimulation and 20 minutes after stimulation. Additionally, mood data was collected using the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) before each 3-back session. Overall the results of the study showed no significant improvements in subjects receiving stimulation on the 3-back task or improvements in mood. Therefore this study suggests more research needs to be done to understand how ultrasound may be able to modulate the prefrontal cortex and to identify potential TUS parameters that may be able to modulate the prefrontal cortex.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, John JB.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL ULTRASOUND (‘TUS’) ON WORKING MEMORYen_US
dc.creatorLazar, Michael Phillipen
dc.contributor.authorLazar, Michael Phillipen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPrevious literature has demonstrated the ability of TMS and tDCS to modulate prefrontal networks involved in verbal working memory and produce improvements on verbal working memory tasks. The goal of this study was to attempt to recreate these results using a novel form of non-invasive brain stimulation that uses transcranial ultrasound (TUS) to modulate neural networks. In this study 20 participants were trained on the 3-back task, a version of the n-back task, and 11 received sham stimulation while the other 9 received active stimulation to the left Dorsoal Lateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC). Subjects then completed the 3-back task right after stimulation and 20 minutes after stimulation. Additionally, mood data was collected using the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) before each 3-back session. Overall the results of the study showed no significant improvements in subjects receiving stimulation on the 3-back task or improvements in mood. Therefore this study suggests more research needs to be done to understand how ultrasound may be able to modulate the prefrontal cortex and to identify potential TUS parameters that may be able to modulate the prefrontal cortex.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John JB.en
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