Hlkelonah Ue Meygeytohl: Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Wildlife Conservation and an Interdisciplinary Approach to Culturally Sensitive Research with the Yurok Tribe

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613237
Title:
Hlkelonah Ue Meygeytohl: Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Wildlife Conservation and an Interdisciplinary Approach to Culturally Sensitive Research with the Yurok Tribe
Author:
Ramos, Seafha C.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The term Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) is generally interpreted as the knowledge held by Indigenous communities about their environment and the cultural frameworks in which such knowledge is transmitted. There is no universally accepted definition of TEK and interpretations can vary between Western and Indigenous lenses. TEK as an academic field has gained a vast literature base; however, there is a dearth of literature in the wildlife field that expresses TEK through an Indigenous lens. There has been growing attention on TEK in the wildlife profession, warranting further exploration of how Indigenous and Western scientific paradigms may be used together in natural resources conservation. Herein, I present my doctoral research, where I focused on a culturally sensitive approach in the pursuit of TEK studies. I conducted interdisciplinary research with the Yurok Tribe of northwestern California in two parts: (1) a human dimensions study where I interviewed Yurok people regarding TEK and their relationship with wildlife and (2) a wildlife survey on Yurok ancestral lands where I used genetic analyses of scats as a noninvasive method for determining species presence and diet. In addition, I developed a synthesis document regarding historical aspects of Indian Country in the United States and philosophical contexts of TEK as science to facilitate dialogue regarding cultural sensitivity in wildlife research with a TEK component. During an internship with the National Park Service (NPS), I developed a guidance document to provide resources regarding TEK in wildlife conservation and a case study detailing how I navigated my doctoral research. My dissertation consists of five manuscripts, each formatted for a specific journal or the NPS.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Mesocarnivore; Traditional ecological knowledge; Wildlife conservation; Wildlife scat analysis; Yurok Tribe; Natural Resources; American Indian
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Culver, Melanie; Colombi, Benedict

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHlkelonah Ue Meygeytohl: Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Wildlife Conservation and an Interdisciplinary Approach to Culturally Sensitive Research with the Yurok Tribeen_US
dc.creatorRamos, Seafha C.en
dc.contributor.authorRamos, Seafha C.en
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe term Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) is generally interpreted as the knowledge held by Indigenous communities about their environment and the cultural frameworks in which such knowledge is transmitted. There is no universally accepted definition of TEK and interpretations can vary between Western and Indigenous lenses. TEK as an academic field has gained a vast literature base; however, there is a dearth of literature in the wildlife field that expresses TEK through an Indigenous lens. There has been growing attention on TEK in the wildlife profession, warranting further exploration of how Indigenous and Western scientific paradigms may be used together in natural resources conservation. Herein, I present my doctoral research, where I focused on a culturally sensitive approach in the pursuit of TEK studies. I conducted interdisciplinary research with the Yurok Tribe of northwestern California in two parts: (1) a human dimensions study where I interviewed Yurok people regarding TEK and their relationship with wildlife and (2) a wildlife survey on Yurok ancestral lands where I used genetic analyses of scats as a noninvasive method for determining species presence and diet. In addition, I developed a synthesis document regarding historical aspects of Indian Country in the United States and philosophical contexts of TEK as science to facilitate dialogue regarding cultural sensitivity in wildlife research with a TEK component. During an internship with the National Park Service (NPS), I developed a guidance document to provide resources regarding TEK in wildlife conservation and a case study detailing how I navigated my doctoral research. My dissertation consists of five manuscripts, each formatted for a specific journal or the NPS.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectMesocarnivoreen
dc.subjectTraditional ecological knowledgeen
dc.subjectWildlife conservationen
dc.subjectWildlife scat analysisen
dc.subjectYurok Tribeen
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCulver, Melanieen
dc.contributor.advisorColombi, Benedicten
dc.contributor.committeememberKoprowski, Johnen
dc.contributor.committeememberTrosper, Ronalden
dc.contributor.committeememberCulver, Melanieen
dc.contributor.committeememberColombi, Benedicten
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