Consumption, Dispersed. Techno-Malls and Embodied Assemblages at Chiloé Island, Chile

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613225
Title:
Consumption, Dispersed. Techno-Malls and Embodied Assemblages at Chiloé Island, Chile
Author:
Miller, Jacob C.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In recent decades, the built environment has become a political device in new ways. To attend to these particularities, a broadly defined post-humanism has reshaped the way that geographers and other researchers think about what matters in everyday life and what those materials have to do with the question of subjectivity. The critical insights of the "cultural turn" have been updated with reference to the many ways that landscapes and built environments are always embodied experiences that emerge in relation to broader non-human and technological environments. The geographies of consumption, in particular, have been strongly impacted by new technologies that govern the flow of commodities into new spaces, including our everyday lives. This dissertation draws on recent theories of embodiment-including affect and emotion-to explore the politics of the new technological consumer landscapes that have proliferated world wide in the second half of the twentieth century. In Latin America, this expansion was made possible through militarized interventions during periods of dictatorship strongly linked to the geopolitics of the Cold War. Taking Chile as an exemplary case of a rapidly emerging mass consumer society, this dissertation charts the expansion of a dominant sector of society (retail) into new territory, the Chiloé archipelago in southern Chile. The embattled "Mall Paseo Chiloé" offers up an opportunity to explore how embodied feelings are implicated in the production of new consumer landscapes through affective, emotive and non-human interventions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
architecture; assemblage; landscape; shopping malls; Geography; emotion; affect
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jones, John Paul, III

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleConsumption, Dispersed. Techno-Malls and Embodied Assemblages at Chiloé Island, Chileen_US
dc.creatorMiller, Jacob C.en
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Jacob C.en
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn recent decades, the built environment has become a political device in new ways. To attend to these particularities, a broadly defined post-humanism has reshaped the way that geographers and other researchers think about what matters in everyday life and what those materials have to do with the question of subjectivity. The critical insights of the "cultural turn" have been updated with reference to the many ways that landscapes and built environments are always embodied experiences that emerge in relation to broader non-human and technological environments. The geographies of consumption, in particular, have been strongly impacted by new technologies that govern the flow of commodities into new spaces, including our everyday lives. This dissertation draws on recent theories of embodiment-including affect and emotion-to explore the politics of the new technological consumer landscapes that have proliferated world wide in the second half of the twentieth century. In Latin America, this expansion was made possible through militarized interventions during periods of dictatorship strongly linked to the geopolitics of the Cold War. Taking Chile as an exemplary case of a rapidly emerging mass consumer society, this dissertation charts the expansion of a dominant sector of society (retail) into new territory, the Chiloé archipelago in southern Chile. The embattled "Mall Paseo Chiloé" offers up an opportunity to explore how embodied feelings are implicated in the production of new consumer landscapes through affective, emotive and non-human interventions.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectarchitectureen
dc.subjectassemblageen
dc.subjectlandscapeen
dc.subjectshopping mallsen
dc.subjectGeographyen
dc.subjectemotionen
dc.subjectaffecten
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorJones, John Paul, IIIen
dc.contributor.committeememberMarston, Sallieen
dc.contributor.committeememberJoseph, Mirandaen
dc.contributor.committeememberBauer, Carlen
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, John Paul, IIIen
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