EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S AND RELATED DEMENTIA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613157
Title:
EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S AND RELATED DEMENTIA
Author:
KIM, EUNHYE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Alzheimer’s disease affects 5.4 million people in the United States and without a current treatment to cure or reverse the progress of the disease, an estimated 16 million are projected to be affected by 2050.1 Thus, non-pharmacological approaches are relevant in improving the quality of life and reducing the burden of disease. Ongoing research indicates exercise may be linked to cognitive, functional, and neuropsychiatric benefits for those with Alzheimer’s. The aim of this literature review was to analyze the recent studies to determine whether exercise is a worthwhile intervention and which exercise strategy optimizes benefits. The literature review encompassed 17 articles consisting of randomized controlled studies, animal model studies, pilot studies, prospective studies, and analytical reviews. Results from randomized controlled studies showed exercise conferred physical functioning benefits but the heterogeneity between interventions and outcome measures highlights the need for standardizations and guidelines regarding dementia care. Animal models showed that biomarkers of Alzheimer’s pathology were reduced with physical activity, but utilization of advanced imaging and biomarker measurements in humans are needed to show clinical significance. Overall, exercise can be safely implemented with people living with Alzheimer’s but should be tailored to the individual’s needs for the best results.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Keen, Douglas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEVALUATING THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S AND RELATED DEMENTIAen_US
dc.creatorKIM, EUNHYEen
dc.contributor.authorKIM, EUNHYEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractAlzheimer’s disease affects 5.4 million people in the United States and without a current treatment to cure or reverse the progress of the disease, an estimated 16 million are projected to be affected by 2050.1 Thus, non-pharmacological approaches are relevant in improving the quality of life and reducing the burden of disease. Ongoing research indicates exercise may be linked to cognitive, functional, and neuropsychiatric benefits for those with Alzheimer’s. The aim of this literature review was to analyze the recent studies to determine whether exercise is a worthwhile intervention and which exercise strategy optimizes benefits. The literature review encompassed 17 articles consisting of randomized controlled studies, animal model studies, pilot studies, prospective studies, and analytical reviews. Results from randomized controlled studies showed exercise conferred physical functioning benefits but the heterogeneity between interventions and outcome measures highlights the need for standardizations and guidelines regarding dementia care. Animal models showed that biomarkers of Alzheimer’s pathology were reduced with physical activity, but utilization of advanced imaging and biomarker measurements in humans are needed to show clinical significance. Overall, exercise can be safely implemented with people living with Alzheimer’s but should be tailored to the individual’s needs for the best results.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorKeen, Douglasen
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