MOTHERS’ “MUSEUM-TALK”: SOCIALIZATION THROUGH FAMILIAL CONVERSATIONS ABOUT ART

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613134
Title:
MOTHERS’ “MUSEUM-TALK”: SOCIALIZATION THROUGH FAMILIAL CONVERSATIONS ABOUT ART
Author:
KENNEDY, HUNTER LEIGH
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, we observe the language behavior of parents as they accompany their young children (approximately ages 7-10 years) on a visit to the University of Arizona Museum of Art. Cross-cultural study of language socialization practices – those practices that are see within a community as providing children with knowledge of how to be competent communicators in that community – has revealed important patterns of variation between different communities of speakers. And here we hope to investigate language socialization practices in a particular context: the museum. The context of the Art Museum has strong and specific cultural meaning in the US, and is a site of very powerful but often-implied expectations for appropriate behavior, and speech type, whether that is in volume, action, or in vocabulary/subject matter. Specifically the investigation aims to identify the role that a parent assumes within this institutional context with their young school-aged child, and how these roles are reflected via language solidifying a type of ‘museum-talk’. For example, the role of a bystander might be possible, but parents may alternatively take on the role of an educator, or translator.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Linguistics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fountain, Amy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMOTHERS’ “MUSEUM-TALK”: SOCIALIZATION THROUGH FAMILIAL CONVERSATIONS ABOUT ARTen_US
dc.creatorKENNEDY, HUNTER LEIGHen
dc.contributor.authorKENNEDY, HUNTER LEIGHen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we observe the language behavior of parents as they accompany their young children (approximately ages 7-10 years) on a visit to the University of Arizona Museum of Art. Cross-cultural study of language socialization practices – those practices that are see within a community as providing children with knowledge of how to be competent communicators in that community – has revealed important patterns of variation between different communities of speakers. And here we hope to investigate language socialization practices in a particular context: the museum. The context of the Art Museum has strong and specific cultural meaning in the US, and is a site of very powerful but often-implied expectations for appropriate behavior, and speech type, whether that is in volume, action, or in vocabulary/subject matter. Specifically the investigation aims to identify the role that a parent assumes within this institutional context with their young school-aged child, and how these roles are reflected via language solidifying a type of ‘museum-talk’. For example, the role of a bystander might be possible, but parents may alternatively take on the role of an educator, or translator.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFountain, Amyen
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