EVALUATION OF TREPANATION IN THE NEOLITHIC PERIOD BY 19TH CENTURY SCIENTISTS: AN OBJECT LESSON OF SOCIETAL BIAS IN RESEARCH

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613093
Title:
EVALUATION OF TREPANATION IN THE NEOLITHIC PERIOD BY 19TH CENTURY SCIENTISTS: AN OBJECT LESSON OF SOCIETAL BIAS IN RESEARCH
Author:
Jalal Tamimi, Tesneem Akram
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Society shapes a great deal of our ideas and beliefs. No matter the field of research scientists choose to pursue, preconceptions exist that prevents them from being fully objective. To illustrate this point, this article explores the nineteenth century in order to highlight the subjective nature of the scientific community, specifically the neuroscientists at the time. It is my contention that society’s view of race interfered with their objective evaluation of the practice of trepanation in Neolithic times. Trepanation is a practice where a portion of the skull in removed from a living patient. Prominent among several scientists at the time, Paul Broca’s subjective approach to explaining the motivation behind the practice highlights how we are conditioned by our environment. This observation emphasizes the need to be aware of bias whenever we approach new information.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fuglevand, Andrew J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEVALUATION OF TREPANATION IN THE NEOLITHIC PERIOD BY 19TH CENTURY SCIENTISTS: AN OBJECT LESSON OF SOCIETAL BIAS IN RESEARCHen_US
dc.creatorJalal Tamimi, Tesneem Akramen
dc.contributor.authorJalal Tamimi, Tesneem Akramen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractSociety shapes a great deal of our ideas and beliefs. No matter the field of research scientists choose to pursue, preconceptions exist that prevents them from being fully objective. To illustrate this point, this article explores the nineteenth century in order to highlight the subjective nature of the scientific community, specifically the neuroscientists at the time. It is my contention that society’s view of race interfered with their objective evaluation of the practice of trepanation in Neolithic times. Trepanation is a practice where a portion of the skull in removed from a living patient. Prominent among several scientists at the time, Paul Broca’s subjective approach to explaining the motivation behind the practice highlights how we are conditioned by our environment. This observation emphasizes the need to be aware of bias whenever we approach new information.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFuglevand, Andrew J.en
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