Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613082
Title:
HUMAN FACTORS IN OPERATIONS DESIGN
Author:
Chafin, Roy L.
Affiliation:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology
Issue Date:
1982-09
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
There are several underlying factors in the design of an operations organization to control a high technology spacecraft tracking system. The first is the princple of differentiation and integration. The multitude of tasks must be divided so that each individual or team can accomplish assignments without being overloaded. Then, the efforts of all the elements in the organization must be integrated for a consistent attack on the problem of tracking a spacecraft. The differentiation tends to be primarily along technical or functional lines, and by time span, but there are other considerations. The integration is provided by the organization’s coordination and control elements. Operating positions can be designed to be procedurally operated, knowledge operated, or somewhere in-between. “Procedurally operated” means that the operator follows a strict procedure. He does not need to know how the system works, only which procedure to follow. A “knowledge based” operating position means that the operator understands the system sufficiently well to know what to do to accomplish a task. He does not need written procedures. The selection of either procedural based or knowledge based operations influences the operator skill level required, the organization design, and the support required. The system’s uncertainty level, stability level, and complexity are examined to evaluate the level of procedural operation possible.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHUMAN FACTORS IN OPERATIONS DESIGNen_US
dc.contributor.authorChafin, Roy L.en
dc.contributor.departmentJet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technologyen
dc.date.issued1982-09-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThere are several underlying factors in the design of an operations organization to control a high technology spacecraft tracking system. The first is the princple of differentiation and integration. The multitude of tasks must be divided so that each individual or team can accomplish assignments without being overloaded. Then, the efforts of all the elements in the organization must be integrated for a consistent attack on the problem of tracking a spacecraft. The differentiation tends to be primarily along technical or functional lines, and by time span, but there are other considerations. The integration is provided by the organization’s coordination and control elements. Operating positions can be designed to be procedurally operated, knowledge operated, or somewhere in-between. “Procedurally operated” means that the operator follows a strict procedure. He does not need to know how the system works, only which procedure to follow. A “knowledge based” operating position means that the operator understands the system sufficiently well to know what to do to accomplish a task. He does not need written procedures. The selection of either procedural based or knowledge based operations influences the operator skill level required, the organization design, and the support required. The system’s uncertainty level, stability level, and complexity are examined to evaluate the level of procedural operation possible.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613082-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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