A TEST OF SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IN MORPHOLOGY OF THE FEMORAL INTERCONDYLAR FOSSA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613066
Title:
A TEST OF SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IN MORPHOLOGY OF THE FEMORAL INTERCONDYLAR FOSSA
Author:
HERNDON, BRIANNA ELISE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Women in modern populations tend to have more stenotic intercondylar fossae than men, which may contribute to an increased probability of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. We hypothesized that morphological differences are attributable to sexual dimorphism and similar patterns will be observed in past populations. This hypothesis is tested by comparing bilateral femoral intercondylar notch width indices (NWI = intercondylar notch width/bicondylar width) using independent samples t-tests between males and females in a sample of 322 prehistoric Native American individuals from the southwest U.S. Contrary to our predictions, no significant differences in NWI were observed between the sexes for the left (ρ=0.323) or right (ρ=0.278) femur. There was significant directional asymmetry in the development of the distal femur (ρ=0.005), no difference in NWI across age groups (ρ=0.363), and significant differences across sites (ρ=0.001). Differences in NWI between physiographic regions were found to be significant (ρ<0.001). These results suggest that developmental plasticity may play a larger role in the size and geometry of the femoral intercondylar fossa than sexual dimorphism.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Watson, James T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA TEST OF SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IN MORPHOLOGY OF THE FEMORAL INTERCONDYLAR FOSSAen_US
dc.creatorHERNDON, BRIANNA ELISEen
dc.contributor.authorHERNDON, BRIANNA ELISEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractWomen in modern populations tend to have more stenotic intercondylar fossae than men, which may contribute to an increased probability of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. We hypothesized that morphological differences are attributable to sexual dimorphism and similar patterns will be observed in past populations. This hypothesis is tested by comparing bilateral femoral intercondylar notch width indices (NWI = intercondylar notch width/bicondylar width) using independent samples t-tests between males and females in a sample of 322 prehistoric Native American individuals from the southwest U.S. Contrary to our predictions, no significant differences in NWI were observed between the sexes for the left (ρ=0.323) or right (ρ=0.278) femur. There was significant directional asymmetry in the development of the distal femur (ρ=0.005), no difference in NWI across age groups (ρ=0.363), and significant differences across sites (ρ=0.001). Differences in NWI between physiographic regions were found to be significant (ρ<0.001). These results suggest that developmental plasticity may play a larger role in the size and geometry of the femoral intercondylar fossa than sexual dimorphism.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWatson, James T.en
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