Effects of the iron oxide nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B on the viability and regenerative function of neural stem cells: relevance to clinical translation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612997
Title:
Effects of the iron oxide nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B on the viability and regenerative function of neural stem cells: relevance to clinical translation
Author:
Madhavan, Lalitha; Umashankar, Abhishek; Corenblum, Mandi; Ray, Sneha; Yoshimaru, Eriko; Trouard, Theodore; Valdez, Mike
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Neurol; Univ Arizona, Neurosci & Cognit Sci Undergrad Program, Undergrad Biol Res Program; Univ Arizona, Dept Biomed Engn; Univ Arizona, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Inst
Issue Date:
2016-04
Publisher:
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD
Citation:
Effects of the iron oxide nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B on the viability and regenerative function of neural stem cells: relevance to clinical translation 2016:1731 International Journal of Nanomedicine
Journal:
International Journal of Nanomedicine
Rights:
© 2016 Umashankar et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
An essential component of developing successful neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies involves the establishment of methodologies to noninvasively monitor grafted NSCs within brain tissues in real time. In this context, ex vivo labeling with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles has been shown to enable efficient tracking of transplanted NSCs via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, whether and how USPIO labeling affects the intrinsic biology of NSCs is not thoroughly understood, and remains an active area of investigation. Here, we perform a comprehensive examination of rat NSC survival and regenerative function upon labeling with the USPIO, Molday ION Rhodamine B (MIRB), which allows for dual magnetic resonance and optical imaging. After optimization of labeling efficiency, two specific doses of MIRB (20 and 50 mu g/mL) were chosen and were followed for the rest of the study. We observed that both MIRB doses supported the robust detection of NSCs, over an extended period of time in vitro and in vivo after transplantation into the striata of host rats, using MRI and post hoc fluorescence imaging. Both in culture and after neural transplantation, the higher 50 mu g/mL MIRB dose significantly reduced the survival, proliferation, and differentiation rate of the NSCs. Interestingly, although the lower 20 mu g/mL MIRB labeling did not produce overtly negative effects, it increased the proliferation and glial differentiation of the NSCs. Additionally, application of this dose also changed the morphological characteristics of neurons and glia produced after NSC differentiation. Importantly, the transplantation of NSCs labeled with either of the two MIRB doses upregulated the immune response in recipient animals. In particular, in animals receiving the 50 mu g/mL MIRB-labeled NSCs, this immune response consisted of an increased number of CD68(+)-activated microglia, which appeared to have phagocytosed MIRB particles and cells contributing to an exaggerated MRI signal dropout in the animals. Overall, these results indicate that although USPIO particles, such as MIRB, may have advantageous labeling and magnetic resonance-sensitive features for NSC tracking, a further examination of their effects might be necessary before they can be used in clinical scenarios of cell-based transplantation.
ISSN:
1178-2013
DOI:
10.2147/IJN.S102006
Keywords:
MRI; neural stem cells; iron oxide nanoparticles; USPIO
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
We thank Kayla Yu and Quentin Remley for their technical assistance on the histological aspects of the project. We are also grateful to Doug Cromey (Arizona Cancer Center Imaging Core Cancer Center Support Grant [P30 CA023074]) for his technical support with confocal microscopy and image analysis. This work was supported by intramural funds from The University of Arizona to LM.
Additional Links:
https://www.dovepress.com/effects-of-the-iron-oxide-nanoparticle-molday-ion-rhodamine-b-on-the-v-peer-reviewed-article-IJN

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMadhavan, Lalithaen
dc.contributor.authorUmashankar, Abhisheken
dc.contributor.authorCorenblum, Mandien
dc.contributor.authorRay, Snehaen
dc.contributor.authorYoshimaru, Erikoen
dc.contributor.authorTrouard, Theodoreen
dc.contributor.authorValdez, Mikeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T01:53:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-14T01:53:10Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-
dc.identifier.citationEffects of the iron oxide nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B on the viability and regenerative function of neural stem cells: relevance to clinical translation 2016:1731 International Journal of Nanomedicineen
dc.identifier.issn1178-2013-
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/IJN.S102006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/612997-
dc.description.abstractAn essential component of developing successful neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies involves the establishment of methodologies to noninvasively monitor grafted NSCs within brain tissues in real time. In this context, ex vivo labeling with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles has been shown to enable efficient tracking of transplanted NSCs via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, whether and how USPIO labeling affects the intrinsic biology of NSCs is not thoroughly understood, and remains an active area of investigation. Here, we perform a comprehensive examination of rat NSC survival and regenerative function upon labeling with the USPIO, Molday ION Rhodamine B (MIRB), which allows for dual magnetic resonance and optical imaging. After optimization of labeling efficiency, two specific doses of MIRB (20 and 50 mu g/mL) were chosen and were followed for the rest of the study. We observed that both MIRB doses supported the robust detection of NSCs, over an extended period of time in vitro and in vivo after transplantation into the striata of host rats, using MRI and post hoc fluorescence imaging. Both in culture and after neural transplantation, the higher 50 mu g/mL MIRB dose significantly reduced the survival, proliferation, and differentiation rate of the NSCs. Interestingly, although the lower 20 mu g/mL MIRB labeling did not produce overtly negative effects, it increased the proliferation and glial differentiation of the NSCs. Additionally, application of this dose also changed the morphological characteristics of neurons and glia produced after NSC differentiation. Importantly, the transplantation of NSCs labeled with either of the two MIRB doses upregulated the immune response in recipient animals. In particular, in animals receiving the 50 mu g/mL MIRB-labeled NSCs, this immune response consisted of an increased number of CD68(+)-activated microglia, which appeared to have phagocytosed MIRB particles and cells contributing to an exaggerated MRI signal dropout in the animals. Overall, these results indicate that although USPIO particles, such as MIRB, may have advantageous labeling and magnetic resonance-sensitive features for NSC tracking, a further examination of their effects might be necessary before they can be used in clinical scenarios of cell-based transplantation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Kayla Yu and Quentin Remley for their technical assistance on the histological aspects of the project. We are also grateful to Doug Cromey (Arizona Cancer Center Imaging Core Cancer Center Support Grant [P30 CA023074]) for his technical support with confocal microscopy and image analysis. This work was supported by intramural funds from The University of Arizona to LM.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.dovepress.com/effects-of-the-iron-oxide-nanoparticle-molday-ion-rhodamine-b-on-the-v-peer-reviewed-article-IJNen
dc.rights© 2016 Umashankar et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).en
dc.subjectMRIen
dc.subjectneural stem cellsen
dc.subjectiron oxide nanoparticlesen
dc.subjectUSPIOen
dc.titleEffects of the iron oxide nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B on the viability and regenerative function of neural stem cells: relevance to clinical translationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Neurolen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Neurosci & Cognit Sci Undergrad Program, Undergrad Biol Res Programen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Biomed Engnen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Insten
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Nanomedicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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