Implementing and Evaluating Variable Soil Thickness in the Community Land Model, Version 4.5 (CLM4.5)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612995
Title:
Implementing and Evaluating Variable Soil Thickness in the Community Land Model, Version 4.5 (CLM4.5)
Author:
Brunke, Michael A.; Broxton, Patrick; Pelletier, Jon; Gochis, David; Hazenberg, Pieter; Lawrence, David M.; Leung, L. Ruby; Niu, Guo-Yue; Troch, Peter A.; Zeng, Xubin
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Atmospher Sci; Univ Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Water Resources; Univ Arizona, Dept Geosci
Issue Date:
2016-05
Publisher:
AMER METEOROLOGICAL SOC
Citation:
Implementing and Evaluating Variable Soil Thickness in the Community Land Model, Version 4.5 (CLM4.5) 2016, 29 (9):3441 Journal of Climate
Journal:
Journal of Climate
Rights:
Copyright © 2016 American Meteorological Society
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
One of the recognized weaknesses of land surface models as used in weather and climate models is the assumption of constant soil thickness because of the lack of global estimates of bedrock depth. Using a 30-arc-s global dataset for the thickness of relatively porous, unconsolidated sediments over bedrock, spatial variation in soil thickness is included here in version 4.5 of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). The number of soil layers for each grid cell is determined from the average soil depth for each 0.9 degrees latitude x 1.25 degrees longitude grid cell. The greatest changes in the simulation with variable soil thickness are to baseflow, with the annual minimum generally occurring earlier. Smaller changes are seen in latent heat flux and surface runoff primarily as a result of an increase in the annual cycle amplitude. These changes are related to soil moisture changes that are most substantial in locations with shallow bedrock. Total water storage (TWS) anomalies are not strongly affected over most river basins since most basins contain mostly deep soils, but TWS anomalies are substantially different for a river basin with more mountainous terrain. Additionally, the annual cycle in soil temperature is partially affected by including realistic soil thicknesses resulting from changes in the vertical profile of heat capacity and thermal conductivity. However, the largest changes to soil temperature are introduced by the soil moisture changes in the variable soil thickness simulation. This implementation of variable soil thickness represents a step forward in land surface model development.
ISSN:
0894-8755; 1520-0442
DOI:
10.1175/JCLI-D-15-0307.1
Keywords:
WATER-TABLE DYNAMICS; RICHARDS EQUATION; ROOT DISTRIBUTION; CLIMATE MODEL; GLOBAL-SCALE; PART I; SIMULATION; SURFACE; DEPTH; MOISTURE
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
This work was supported by DOE (DE-SC0006773), NASA (NNX13AK82A), and NSF (AGS-0944101). L. R. Leung was supported by the DOE Office of Science Biological and Environmental Research Earth System Modeling program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. We thank the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for providing the GRACE data, which were processed by Sean Swenson under support from the NASA MEaSUREs Program. High-performance computing support was provided by NCAR's Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, through computing time on Yellowstone (http://n2t.net/ark:/85065/d7wd3xhc) and on The University of Arizona Research Computing
Additional Links:
http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JCLI-D-15-0307.1

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrunke, Michael A.en
dc.contributor.authorBroxton, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorPelletier, Jonen
dc.contributor.authorGochis, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorHazenberg, Pieteren
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, David M.en
dc.contributor.authorLeung, L. Rubyen
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Guo-Yueen
dc.contributor.authorTroch, Peter A.en
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Xubinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T01:43:05Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-14T01:43:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-
dc.identifier.citationImplementing and Evaluating Variable Soil Thickness in the Community Land Model, Version 4.5 (CLM4.5) 2016, 29 (9):3441 Journal of Climateen
dc.identifier.issn0894-8755-
dc.identifier.issn1520-0442-
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-15-0307.1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/612995-
dc.description.abstractOne of the recognized weaknesses of land surface models as used in weather and climate models is the assumption of constant soil thickness because of the lack of global estimates of bedrock depth. Using a 30-arc-s global dataset for the thickness of relatively porous, unconsolidated sediments over bedrock, spatial variation in soil thickness is included here in version 4.5 of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). The number of soil layers for each grid cell is determined from the average soil depth for each 0.9 degrees latitude x 1.25 degrees longitude grid cell. The greatest changes in the simulation with variable soil thickness are to baseflow, with the annual minimum generally occurring earlier. Smaller changes are seen in latent heat flux and surface runoff primarily as a result of an increase in the annual cycle amplitude. These changes are related to soil moisture changes that are most substantial in locations with shallow bedrock. Total water storage (TWS) anomalies are not strongly affected over most river basins since most basins contain mostly deep soils, but TWS anomalies are substantially different for a river basin with more mountainous terrain. Additionally, the annual cycle in soil temperature is partially affected by including realistic soil thicknesses resulting from changes in the vertical profile of heat capacity and thermal conductivity. However, the largest changes to soil temperature are introduced by the soil moisture changes in the variable soil thickness simulation. This implementation of variable soil thickness represents a step forward in land surface model development.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by DOE (DE-SC0006773), NASA (NNX13AK82A), and NSF (AGS-0944101). L. R. Leung was supported by the DOE Office of Science Biological and Environmental Research Earth System Modeling program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. We thank the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for providing the GRACE data, which were processed by Sean Swenson under support from the NASA MEaSUREs Program. High-performance computing support was provided by NCAR's Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, through computing time on Yellowstone (http://n2t.net/ark:/85065/d7wd3xhc) and on The University of Arizona Research Computingen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER METEOROLOGICAL SOCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JCLI-D-15-0307.1en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 American Meteorological Societyen
dc.subjectWATER-TABLE DYNAMICSen
dc.subjectRICHARDS EQUATIONen
dc.subjectROOT DISTRIBUTIONen
dc.subjectCLIMATE MODELen
dc.subjectGLOBAL-SCALEen
dc.subjectPART Ien
dc.subjectSIMULATIONen
dc.subjectSURFACEen
dc.subjectDEPTHen
dc.subjectMOISTUREen
dc.titleImplementing and Evaluating Variable Soil Thickness in the Community Land Model, Version 4.5 (CLM4.5)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Atmospher Scien
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Water Resourcesen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Geoscien
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Climateen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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