CELLULOSE DEGRADATION IN LUTEIBACTER: SUSPECTED GENETIC MECHANISMS AND BIOCHEMICAL APPLICATIONS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612981
Title:
CELLULOSE DEGRADATION IN LUTEIBACTER: SUSPECTED GENETIC MECHANISMS AND BIOCHEMICAL APPLICATIONS
Author:
GLANDON, ALEXANDRA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The role of Luteibacter as a cellulose degradation microorganism is examined in this thesis. An overview of some of the key functions of cellulose in the biosphere is given as well as a review of cellulolytic strategies and mechanisms employed in the microscopic world. A brief characterization of the genus Luteibacter is also provided. Experiments were aimed at evaluating loss of function cellulase mutants and abnormal phenotypic mutants in order to better characterize potential genetic pathways used by Luteibacter in cellulose degradation. While there is still much work to be done evaluating this system, initial results indicate that the protein GfcC as well as a phosphokinase and a type I secretion system likely play important roles in Luteibacter’s ability to secrete cellulase. Future plasmid sequencing data will likely shed more light on the specific gene regions associated with cellulase production and secretion in Luteibacter. Further understanding of the mechanisms and genetics behind cellulose degradation in Luteibacter will provide key insights into the process of microbial cellulose utilization as a whole, a process which has implications in a wide variety of innovative biological and industrial fields.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Baltrus, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCELLULOSE DEGRADATION IN LUTEIBACTER: SUSPECTED GENETIC MECHANISMS AND BIOCHEMICAL APPLICATIONSen_US
dc.creatorGLANDON, ALEXANDRAen
dc.contributor.authorGLANDON, ALEXANDRAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe role of Luteibacter as a cellulose degradation microorganism is examined in this thesis. An overview of some of the key functions of cellulose in the biosphere is given as well as a review of cellulolytic strategies and mechanisms employed in the microscopic world. A brief characterization of the genus Luteibacter is also provided. Experiments were aimed at evaluating loss of function cellulase mutants and abnormal phenotypic mutants in order to better characterize potential genetic pathways used by Luteibacter in cellulose degradation. While there is still much work to be done evaluating this system, initial results indicate that the protein GfcC as well as a phosphokinase and a type I secretion system likely play important roles in Luteibacter’s ability to secrete cellulase. Future plasmid sequencing data will likely shed more light on the specific gene regions associated with cellulase production and secretion in Luteibacter. Further understanding of the mechanisms and genetics behind cellulose degradation in Luteibacter will provide key insights into the process of microbial cellulose utilization as a whole, a process which has implications in a wide variety of innovative biological and industrial fields.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBaltrus, Daviden
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