SLEEP REACTIVITY AND PARASYMPATHETIC CONTROL WHEN RETURNING TO SLEEP

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612960
Title:
SLEEP REACTIVITY AND PARASYMPATHETIC CONTROL WHEN RETURNING TO SLEEP
Author:
HAFEZI, AUTRI NICOLE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Insomnia is among the most common health problems and is associated with lower parasympathetic control. Sleep reactivity is associated with development of chronic insomnia. The purpose of this study was to examine whether sleep reactivity is associated with parasympathetic control in response to a sleep-relevant stressor. Parasympathetic control was operationalized using respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Sleep reactivity was operationalized as a score of 14 or higher on the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST). Participants were 33 healthy young adults required to adhere to a fixed eight-hour sleep schedule for three nights before an in-laboratory sleep study. Physiological signals were recorded for two five-minute baseline periods of resting wakefulness prior to lights out. Participants were woken after the first five minutes of contiguous N2 sleep in the third NREM period and kept awake for 15 minutes, then allowed to return to sleep. In a multiple linear regression, the interaction between baseline RSA and sleep reactivity predicted RSA when returning to sleep. Individuals with high sleep reactivity had relatively low parasympathetic control when returning to sleep. People with high sleep reactivity may benefit from interventions to increase parasympathetic control during awakenings from sleep.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, John J.B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSLEEP REACTIVITY AND PARASYMPATHETIC CONTROL WHEN RETURNING TO SLEEPen_US
dc.creatorHAFEZI, AUTRI NICOLEen
dc.contributor.authorHAFEZI, AUTRI NICOLEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractInsomnia is among the most common health problems and is associated with lower parasympathetic control. Sleep reactivity is associated with development of chronic insomnia. The purpose of this study was to examine whether sleep reactivity is associated with parasympathetic control in response to a sleep-relevant stressor. Parasympathetic control was operationalized using respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Sleep reactivity was operationalized as a score of 14 or higher on the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST). Participants were 33 healthy young adults required to adhere to a fixed eight-hour sleep schedule for three nights before an in-laboratory sleep study. Physiological signals were recorded for two five-minute baseline periods of resting wakefulness prior to lights out. Participants were woken after the first five minutes of contiguous N2 sleep in the third NREM period and kept awake for 15 minutes, then allowed to return to sleep. In a multiple linear regression, the interaction between baseline RSA and sleep reactivity predicted RSA when returning to sleep. Individuals with high sleep reactivity had relatively low parasympathetic control when returning to sleep. People with high sleep reactivity may benefit from interventions to increase parasympathetic control during awakenings from sleep.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John J.B.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.