EFFECTS OF RESVERATROL ON DRUG- AND CARCINOGEN-METABOLIZING ENZYMES, IMPLICATIONS FOR CHEMOPREVENTION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612958
Title:
EFFECTS OF RESVERATROL ON DRUG- AND CARCINOGEN-METABOLIZING ENZYMES, IMPLICATIONS FOR CHEMOPREVENTION
Author:
GUTHRIE, ARIANE RENEE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Resveratrol is a polyphenol found in grape skins and peanuts that has demonstrated many health benefits including protection against aging, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, neurological decline and cancer. The anticancer properties of resveratrol have been attributed to a variety of mechanisms, including its general inhibition of phase I metabolism and induction of phase II metabolism. The effects of resveratrol on these enzymes, however, are still unclear, as in vitro evidence often contrasts with animal studies and clinical trials. Reasons for these variances could include the low bioavailability of resveratrol and activity of resveratrol metabolites. Due to resveratrol’s interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, individuals concurrently taking pharmacological doses of resveratrol with other supplements or medications could potentially experience nutrient-drug interactions. The first part of this thesis reviews the known effects of resveratrol and its main metabolites on drug metabolism. The second portion introduces preliminary data from the metabolomic analysis of stored urine samples collected from a previous resveratrol clinical study. The overarching aim of this work is to characterize which populations might benefit from resveratrol for the prevention of cancer, as well as identify those that may need to avoid supplementation due to potential drug interactions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Martinez, Jessica A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEFFECTS OF RESVERATROL ON DRUG- AND CARCINOGEN-METABOLIZING ENZYMES, IMPLICATIONS FOR CHEMOPREVENTIONen_US
dc.creatorGUTHRIE, ARIANE RENEEen
dc.contributor.authorGUTHRIE, ARIANE RENEEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractResveratrol is a polyphenol found in grape skins and peanuts that has demonstrated many health benefits including protection against aging, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, neurological decline and cancer. The anticancer properties of resveratrol have been attributed to a variety of mechanisms, including its general inhibition of phase I metabolism and induction of phase II metabolism. The effects of resveratrol on these enzymes, however, are still unclear, as in vitro evidence often contrasts with animal studies and clinical trials. Reasons for these variances could include the low bioavailability of resveratrol and activity of resveratrol metabolites. Due to resveratrol’s interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, individuals concurrently taking pharmacological doses of resveratrol with other supplements or medications could potentially experience nutrient-drug interactions. The first part of this thesis reviews the known effects of resveratrol and its main metabolites on drug metabolism. The second portion introduces preliminary data from the metabolomic analysis of stored urine samples collected from a previous resveratrol clinical study. The overarching aim of this work is to characterize which populations might benefit from resveratrol for the prevention of cancer, as well as identify those that may need to avoid supplementation due to potential drug interactions.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMartinez, Jessica A.en
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