IMPROVEMENTS IN CONSCIOUS EATING BEHAVIORS IN UNDERGRADUATE NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE STUDENTS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612930
Title:
IMPROVEMENTS IN CONSCIOUS EATING BEHAVIORS IN UNDERGRADUATE NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE STUDENTS
Author:
FRANKLIN, ALEXANDRA MARIE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
While knowledge and awareness are necessary to prepare students to provide nutritional advice and counseling in the future, there is limited evidence demonstrating a link between nutrition education and healthy eating habits among nutritional science students. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if nutritional science students adopt more conscious eating behaviors as they progress through the curriculum. Undergraduate nutrition majors (n =278) and non-nutrition majors (n=104) were surveyed with 20 questions regarding their eating and grocery shopping habits. Additionally, focus groups consisting of nutritional science seniors (n =27) were held to further explain data from the surveys. The surveys revealed that fourth year nutrition majors ate significantly more servings of vegetables (p=0.001) and shopped for groceries significantly more frequently (p<0.001) than first year nutrition majors. Additionally, obtaining minimally processed foods at the grocery store was marginally significantly more important to fourth year nutrition majors than first year nutrition majors (p=0.058). The focus group meetings revealed that senior-level nutrition students’ grocery shopping habits and eating behaviors were influenced by education, living situation, and improvements in time management skills. Because nutritional science is a discipline that includes everyday practices the results may be related to their daily professional development.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nutritional Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hongu, Nobuko

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIMPROVEMENTS IN CONSCIOUS EATING BEHAVIORS IN UNDERGRADUATE NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE STUDENTSen_US
dc.creatorFRANKLIN, ALEXANDRA MARIEen
dc.contributor.authorFRANKLIN, ALEXANDRA MARIEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractWhile knowledge and awareness are necessary to prepare students to provide nutritional advice and counseling in the future, there is limited evidence demonstrating a link between nutrition education and healthy eating habits among nutritional science students. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if nutritional science students adopt more conscious eating behaviors as they progress through the curriculum. Undergraduate nutrition majors (n =278) and non-nutrition majors (n=104) were surveyed with 20 questions regarding their eating and grocery shopping habits. Additionally, focus groups consisting of nutritional science seniors (n =27) were held to further explain data from the surveys. The surveys revealed that fourth year nutrition majors ate significantly more servings of vegetables (p=0.001) and shopped for groceries significantly more frequently (p<0.001) than first year nutrition majors. Additionally, obtaining minimally processed foods at the grocery store was marginally significantly more important to fourth year nutrition majors than first year nutrition majors (p=0.058). The focus group meetings revealed that senior-level nutrition students’ grocery shopping habits and eating behaviors were influenced by education, living situation, and improvements in time management skills. Because nutritional science is a discipline that includes everyday practices the results may be related to their daily professional development.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorHongu, Nobukoen
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