MAPPING MILITIAS: STUDYING THE EMERGENCE OF MEXICO’S "AUTODEFENSAS"

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612911
Title:
MAPPING MILITIAS: STUDYING THE EMERGENCE OF MEXICO’S "AUTODEFENSAS"
Author:
FLORES, ELYSE MIREYA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Building on recent studies of civilian militias outside the context of civil war and state guidance, this thesis examines the formation of Mexico’s autodefensas, self-defense militias which have risen in the wake of drug violence. Classifying militias by traits including use of violence and quasi-governmental activities, this analysis seeks to identify the primary factors that prompt their formation. My method considers over 30 states, collecting information from articles, reports, and national surveys to determine factors such as government attitudes towards militias, civilian attitudes regarding the formation of autodefensas, and territorial control. I assert that several factors provide conditions for autodefensa emergence, hypothesizing that autodefensas are more likely to form in the absence of a clear authoritative actor. Additionally, militias are more likely to arise when supported by civilians; finally, more autodefensas will form if territorial contestation exists, and the groups enjoy a positive relationship with the government. I find that government support is not influential in the formation of autodefensas. Contrarily, civilian support and territorial contestation show promise in explaining the formation of autodefensas. This paper provides guidance for research regarding civilian use of extralegal security measures, with implications for nations whose governments cannot provide security during violent times
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Braithwaite, Jessica

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMAPPING MILITIAS: STUDYING THE EMERGENCE OF MEXICO’S "AUTODEFENSAS"en_US
dc.creatorFLORES, ELYSE MIREYAen
dc.contributor.authorFLORES, ELYSE MIREYAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractBuilding on recent studies of civilian militias outside the context of civil war and state guidance, this thesis examines the formation of Mexico’s autodefensas, self-defense militias which have risen in the wake of drug violence. Classifying militias by traits including use of violence and quasi-governmental activities, this analysis seeks to identify the primary factors that prompt their formation. My method considers over 30 states, collecting information from articles, reports, and national surveys to determine factors such as government attitudes towards militias, civilian attitudes regarding the formation of autodefensas, and territorial control. I assert that several factors provide conditions for autodefensa emergence, hypothesizing that autodefensas are more likely to form in the absence of a clear authoritative actor. Additionally, militias are more likely to arise when supported by civilians; finally, more autodefensas will form if territorial contestation exists, and the groups enjoy a positive relationship with the government. I find that government support is not influential in the formation of autodefensas. Contrarily, civilian support and territorial contestation show promise in explaining the formation of autodefensas. This paper provides guidance for research regarding civilian use of extralegal security measures, with implications for nations whose governments cannot provide security during violent timesen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBraithwaite, Jessicaen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.