Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612890
Title:
REMEMBERING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION IN TIMES OF CRISIS, 1939-1945
Author:
FISCHER, DANA ELIZABETH
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In American society, the collective memory of the American past has historically been characterized by consensus, intended to support social stability. However, from 1939 to 1945, this pattern breaks off as the past is politicized –becoming the beacon of democracy against the totalitarian regimes characterized by the Axis powers during World War II. Newspaper articles for the New Year, cultural events such as children’s literature, plays, and memorials, as well as academic work all reexamine the American past, and the American Revolution in particular, drawing distinct connections between the two eras. This use of the past supported democracy in the face of oppressive regimes, and signaled a desire to encourage democratic traditions throughout the world. The imagery and characters of the Revolution colored the cultural dialogue of the World War II era in the United States, changing the way Americans considered their own past and inherited legacies.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vetter, Jeremy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleREMEMBERING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION IN TIMES OF CRISIS, 1939-1945en_US
dc.creatorFISCHER, DANA ELIZABETHen
dc.contributor.authorFISCHER, DANA ELIZABETHen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn American society, the collective memory of the American past has historically been characterized by consensus, intended to support social stability. However, from 1939 to 1945, this pattern breaks off as the past is politicized –becoming the beacon of democracy against the totalitarian regimes characterized by the Axis powers during World War II. Newspaper articles for the New Year, cultural events such as children’s literature, plays, and memorials, as well as academic work all reexamine the American past, and the American Revolution in particular, drawing distinct connections between the two eras. This use of the past supported democracy in the face of oppressive regimes, and signaled a desire to encourage democratic traditions throughout the world. The imagery and characters of the Revolution colored the cultural dialogue of the World War II era in the United States, changing the way Americans considered their own past and inherited legacies.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorVetter, Jeremyen
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