The Effects of Student Social Class on Learning in Computer-Mediated Versus Face-to-Face Settings

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612889
Title:
The Effects of Student Social Class on Learning in Computer-Mediated Versus Face-to-Face Settings
Author:
Leavitt, Peter
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Contemporary higher education makes use of computers and the Internet more than ever before and the extent to which education is delivered via these media is only likely to increase in the future. While computer-mediated communication and education have been studied extensively, relatively little research has examined the potential impact of cultural background (e.g. social class) on students' experiences of different learning media. To address this gap, the current research uses a multi-sample (6 samples; n = 473), quasi-experimental approach to interrogate the relationship between student social class background and learning environment on various educational and individual outcomes. Examining a trichotomous (lower, middle, upper) conceptualization of social class across three distinct learning environments (face-to-face, computer-mediated, and fully-online) I find evidence of effects of student social class, learning environment and their interaction. In general, middle class students vary the least across conditions; lower class students tend to score lower on outcomes overall but with some notable exceptions for shared experience in face-to-face settings and comfort in online settings; and upper class students tend to experience a laboratory-based computer-mediated learning environment most positively. Implications for studying computer-mediated learning and social class are discussed, along with implications for real-world online education.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
culture; shared experience; social class; Psychology; computer-mediated learning
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sullivan, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Effects of Student Social Class on Learning in Computer-Mediated Versus Face-to-Face Settingsen_US
dc.creatorLeavitt, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorLeavitt, Peteren
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractContemporary higher education makes use of computers and the Internet more than ever before and the extent to which education is delivered via these media is only likely to increase in the future. While computer-mediated communication and education have been studied extensively, relatively little research has examined the potential impact of cultural background (e.g. social class) on students' experiences of different learning media. To address this gap, the current research uses a multi-sample (6 samples; n = 473), quasi-experimental approach to interrogate the relationship between student social class background and learning environment on various educational and individual outcomes. Examining a trichotomous (lower, middle, upper) conceptualization of social class across three distinct learning environments (face-to-face, computer-mediated, and fully-online) I find evidence of effects of student social class, learning environment and their interaction. In general, middle class students vary the least across conditions; lower class students tend to score lower on outcomes overall but with some notable exceptions for shared experience in face-to-face settings and comfort in online settings; and upper class students tend to experience a laboratory-based computer-mediated learning environment most positively. Implications for studying computer-mediated learning and social class are discussed, along with implications for real-world online education.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectshared experienceen
dc.subjectsocial classen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectcomputer-mediated learningen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSullivan, Danielen
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jeffen
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthias R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberStone, Jeffreyen
dc.contributor.committeememberSullivan, Danielen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.