Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612885
Title:
DYSPROSIUM: A UNITED STATES SECURITY CONCERN
Author:
EULANO, ANTHONY CONNOR
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper seeks to explore how United States dependency on foreign supplies of dysprosium affects its ability to produce and maintain current and future military defense systems. Dysprosium, one of the 17 rare earth metals, is necessary for the production of powerful permanent magnets. These magnets are used in high-tech weapon systems, such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. The problem is that the U.S. remains completely dependent on China for its dysprosium supply. This paper does not seek to answer the possibility or likelihood of China blocking the supply of dysprosium to the U.S. Instead, it will attempt to identify U.S. vulnerabilities to a foreign supply disruption. This report finds that remaining completely dependent on China for dysprosium and having no stockpile of dysprosium puts U.S. security at risk. There are virtually no current effective substitutes for dysprosium, and in the event of a sustained supply disruption, it would be very difficult for the U.S. military to produce and maintain current and future high-tech weapon systems during the first several years of the disruption. The potential for developing some alternative supplies of dysprosium–as well as developing electronic components that use less or no dysprosium–would increase over the longer-term.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tidd, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDYSPROSIUM: A UNITED STATES SECURITY CONCERNen_US
dc.creatorEULANO, ANTHONY CONNORen
dc.contributor.authorEULANO, ANTHONY CONNORen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper seeks to explore how United States dependency on foreign supplies of dysprosium affects its ability to produce and maintain current and future military defense systems. Dysprosium, one of the 17 rare earth metals, is necessary for the production of powerful permanent magnets. These magnets are used in high-tech weapon systems, such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. The problem is that the U.S. remains completely dependent on China for its dysprosium supply. This paper does not seek to answer the possibility or likelihood of China blocking the supply of dysprosium to the U.S. Instead, it will attempt to identify U.S. vulnerabilities to a foreign supply disruption. This report finds that remaining completely dependent on China for dysprosium and having no stockpile of dysprosium puts U.S. security at risk. There are virtually no current effective substitutes for dysprosium, and in the event of a sustained supply disruption, it would be very difficult for the U.S. military to produce and maintain current and future high-tech weapon systems during the first several years of the disruption. The potential for developing some alternative supplies of dysprosium–as well as developing electronic components that use less or no dysprosium–would increase over the longer-term.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorTidd, Johnen
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