Narrations from the U.S.-Mexico Border: Transfronterizo Student and Parent Experiences with American Schools

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612872
Title:
Narrations from the U.S.-Mexico Border: Transfronterizo Student and Parent Experiences with American Schools
Author:
Tessman, Darcy
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In education today, Latino populations are growing, but Telles and Ortiz (2013) claim they account for the lowest academic levels and the highest levels of dropouts. Latino transfronterizo (literally border crossing) students and their parents in this study have high academic aspirations in spite of challenges of poverty, second language acquisition, and other difficulties which arise from U.S.-Mexico border contexts. Through dissecting the events of the 1990s and early 2000s, the progression of northern migration from Mexico and the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 influenced anti-immigrant sentiment along the border and enactment of laws and policies to limit circumnavigating the international line. Misidentification as illegal immigrants creates borderland perceptions that Latinos are suspects and often results in discriminatory treatment from postcolonial dominant culture. This culture is reflected and perpetuated in schools where home language surveys identify native Spanish speakers to segregate them into Structured English Immersion programs for students with Limited English Proficiency. Ethnographic research from January of 2013 to August of 2015 included over 300 observations and 14 semi-structured interviews with seven transfronterizo students and nine parents revealed language disconnects between school and home. Relationships between teachers and students/parents did not exist and trust was lacking. Latino parents wanted to help students with school, but English only requirements limited their assistance. Through the use of Furman's ethic of community and Yosso's community cultural wealth, educational leaders could create communal process at schools to build the capacity of teachers and parents to create relationships and shared cultural competencies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Ethic of Care; Latino Parent Involvement; Social Justice; Trust; US-Mexico Border; Educational Leadership & Policy; Community Cultural Wealth
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Leadership & Policy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Koyama, Jill

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNarrations from the U.S.-Mexico Border: Transfronterizo Student and Parent Experiences with American Schoolsen_US
dc.creatorTessman, Darcyen
dc.contributor.authorTessman, Darcyen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn education today, Latino populations are growing, but Telles and Ortiz (2013) claim they account for the lowest academic levels and the highest levels of dropouts. Latino transfronterizo (literally border crossing) students and their parents in this study have high academic aspirations in spite of challenges of poverty, second language acquisition, and other difficulties which arise from U.S.-Mexico border contexts. Through dissecting the events of the 1990s and early 2000s, the progression of northern migration from Mexico and the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 influenced anti-immigrant sentiment along the border and enactment of laws and policies to limit circumnavigating the international line. Misidentification as illegal immigrants creates borderland perceptions that Latinos are suspects and often results in discriminatory treatment from postcolonial dominant culture. This culture is reflected and perpetuated in schools where home language surveys identify native Spanish speakers to segregate them into Structured English Immersion programs for students with Limited English Proficiency. Ethnographic research from January of 2013 to August of 2015 included over 300 observations and 14 semi-structured interviews with seven transfronterizo students and nine parents revealed language disconnects between school and home. Relationships between teachers and students/parents did not exist and trust was lacking. Latino parents wanted to help students with school, but English only requirements limited their assistance. Through the use of Furman's ethic of community and Yosso's community cultural wealth, educational leaders could create communal process at schools to build the capacity of teachers and parents to create relationships and shared cultural competencies.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectEthic of Careen
dc.subjectLatino Parent Involvementen
dc.subjectSocial Justiceen
dc.subjectTrusten
dc.subjectUS-Mexico Borderen
dc.subjectEducational Leadership & Policyen
dc.subjectCommunity Cultural Wealthen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadership & Policyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorKoyama, Jillen
dc.contributor.committeememberYlimaki, Roseen
dc.contributor.committeememberNicholas, Sheilahen
dc.contributor.committeememberBrunderman, Lynnetteen
dc.contributor.committeememberKoyama, Jillen
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