HUMOR AS A COMPLEMENTARY THERAPY: AN INSIGHT INTO HUMOR AND LAUGHTER BEING USED AS TREATMENT IN MEDCINE

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612866
Title:
HUMOR AS A COMPLEMENTARY THERAPY: AN INSIGHT INTO HUMOR AND LAUGHTER BEING USED AS TREATMENT IN MEDCINE
Author:
DOBBINS, DAVINA NICOLE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Context – Humor as a Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) has been shown to reduce stress and while the benefits of laughter are not entirely understood, positive physiological outcomes have been found (MacDonald, 2008). Objectives – The PI synthesized information for a literature review and conducted survey and interview-based research in order to gain a better understanding about the potential impacts of Humor as a CAM. Design – Surveys were administered at ProActive Physical Therapy clinics and interviews were conducted. Results - The healthcare professional interviewees had heard of CAM and generally agreed that it needs more research. All spoke highly of laughter in different aspects of their field; interacting with patients, students, subjects, and/or coworkers. About half of the participants were familiar with CAM and utilize it, or would be willing to try it. Despite the wide range of ages and reasons for seeking PT treatment, all subjects enjoyed laughing and deemed it conducive to their healing process. Different humor types were preferred. There were no statistically significant conclusions but overall the results support the idea that humor is helpful in healing. Conclusion - Humor as a CAM could be useful in patient healthcare and mindset when recovering from injury or illness.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rankin, Lucinda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHUMOR AS A COMPLEMENTARY THERAPY: AN INSIGHT INTO HUMOR AND LAUGHTER BEING USED AS TREATMENT IN MEDCINEen_US
dc.creatorDOBBINS, DAVINA NICOLEen
dc.contributor.authorDOBBINS, DAVINA NICOLEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractContext – Humor as a Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) has been shown to reduce stress and while the benefits of laughter are not entirely understood, positive physiological outcomes have been found (MacDonald, 2008). Objectives – The PI synthesized information for a literature review and conducted survey and interview-based research in order to gain a better understanding about the potential impacts of Humor as a CAM. Design – Surveys were administered at ProActive Physical Therapy clinics and interviews were conducted. Results - The healthcare professional interviewees had heard of CAM and generally agreed that it needs more research. All spoke highly of laughter in different aspects of their field; interacting with patients, students, subjects, and/or coworkers. About half of the participants were familiar with CAM and utilize it, or would be willing to try it. Despite the wide range of ages and reasons for seeking PT treatment, all subjects enjoyed laughing and deemed it conducive to their healing process. Different humor types were preferred. There were no statistically significant conclusions but overall the results support the idea that humor is helpful in healing. Conclusion - Humor as a CAM could be useful in patient healthcare and mindset when recovering from injury or illness.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRankin, Lucindaen
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