Saudi Arabia in the German-Speaking Imagination: Identity, Space and Representation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612850
Title:
Saudi Arabia in the German-Speaking Imagination: Identity, Space and Representation
Author:
Cassia, Antonella
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research aims to explore how representations of Saudi Arabia in German travel literature, pilgrimage accounts and online media have transformed the Saudi Arabian space and its place in the European imagination. German travelers, pilgrims, and expatriates enter the foreign Saudi Arabian space, and decipher it in their narratives. The diachronic analysis of several representative texts by German authors from the 18th and 19th centuries narrating their journey to what is today known as Saudi Arabia, shows that the images conveyed in their writings should be conceived in a multidimensional way beyond the lens of historical analysis, taking into account notions of gender, personal motivations, nationality and religion. Analysis of pilgrimage accounts by German converts from the 20th and 21st century reveals an unreflected representation of Western societies and German people in the Middle East. These narratives play a fundamental role in building a bridge connecting Muslim immigrants living in the diaspora with German converts. However, to quote Marcia Hermansen (1999) "even though Western Muslim narrators avoid the excesses of their Christian precursors, they are not completely free from a colonial gaze and "Orientalist" attitudes": in their narratives both the desert and the Bedouins become an imagined and fictionalized trope. In the last part of my dissertation I explore the blogosphere produced by German expatriates living in Saudi Arabia, arguing that expatriate blogs have become a space for cultural representation and othering, that share similarities with the genre of travel writing.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Conversion to Islam; German travelers; Muhammad Asad; Pilgrimage narratives; Saudi Arabia; German Studies; Blogs
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; German Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kosta, Barbara

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSaudi Arabia in the German-Speaking Imagination: Identity, Space and Representationen_US
dc.creatorCassia, Antonellaen
dc.contributor.authorCassia, Antonellaen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis research aims to explore how representations of Saudi Arabia in German travel literature, pilgrimage accounts and online media have transformed the Saudi Arabian space and its place in the European imagination. German travelers, pilgrims, and expatriates enter the foreign Saudi Arabian space, and decipher it in their narratives. The diachronic analysis of several representative texts by German authors from the 18th and 19th centuries narrating their journey to what is today known as Saudi Arabia, shows that the images conveyed in their writings should be conceived in a multidimensional way beyond the lens of historical analysis, taking into account notions of gender, personal motivations, nationality and religion. Analysis of pilgrimage accounts by German converts from the 20th and 21st century reveals an unreflected representation of Western societies and German people in the Middle East. These narratives play a fundamental role in building a bridge connecting Muslim immigrants living in the diaspora with German converts. However, to quote Marcia Hermansen (1999) "even though Western Muslim narrators avoid the excesses of their Christian precursors, they are not completely free from a colonial gaze and "Orientalist" attitudes": in their narratives both the desert and the Bedouins become an imagined and fictionalized trope. In the last part of my dissertation I explore the blogosphere produced by German expatriates living in Saudi Arabia, arguing that expatriate blogs have become a space for cultural representation and othering, that share similarities with the genre of travel writing.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectConversion to Islamen
dc.subjectGerman travelersen
dc.subjectMuhammad Asaden
dc.subjectPilgrimage narrativesen
dc.subjectSaudi Arabiaen
dc.subjectGerman Studiesen
dc.subjectBlogsen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineGerman Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorKosta, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.committeememberHudson, Leilaen
dc.contributor.committeememberMartinson, Stevenen
dc.contributor.committeememberKosta, Barbaraen
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