Hispanic Parents' Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs Toward Human Papillomavirus and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612848
Title:
Hispanic Parents' Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs Toward Human Papillomavirus and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Arizona
Author:
Raleigh, Sarah Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection that represents a serious health issue that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Although FDA-approved vaccines for the prevention against the majority of strains responsible for cervical cancer and genital warts have been available for many years, immunization rates remain low. This study will consider cervical cancer as the main consequence of HPV and thus will investigate parents of daughters. This is of particular relevance to Arizona, given the large Hispanic population and the racial and ethnic disparities that exist in the incidence, mortality and survival of cervical cancer when compared to the national average. Administration of the three-dose series is recommended for girls and boys beginning at 12 years of age. The target population of this study was parents as the HPV vaccine necessitates parental consent and immunization rates remain low. This study specifically aimed to explore the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Hispanic parents in Maricopa County toward the HPV vaccine in efforts to identify barriers to immunization and create future implications for practice. Findings were consistent with previous literature: Hispanic parents exhibited suboptimal knowledge regarding HPV and HPV vaccination. Specific opportunities for education include the etiology, transmission and health consequences of HPV. Despite many areas for education, the majority of Hispanic parents indicated they would follow their health providers' recommendation on vaccination.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
HPV; HPV vaccination; Nursing; Hispanic parents
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Berg, Judith A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHispanic Parents' Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs Toward Human Papillomavirus and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorRaleigh, Sarah Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorRaleigh, Sarah Elizabethen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection that represents a serious health issue that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Although FDA-approved vaccines for the prevention against the majority of strains responsible for cervical cancer and genital warts have been available for many years, immunization rates remain low. This study will consider cervical cancer as the main consequence of HPV and thus will investigate parents of daughters. This is of particular relevance to Arizona, given the large Hispanic population and the racial and ethnic disparities that exist in the incidence, mortality and survival of cervical cancer when compared to the national average. Administration of the three-dose series is recommended for girls and boys beginning at 12 years of age. The target population of this study was parents as the HPV vaccine necessitates parental consent and immunization rates remain low. This study specifically aimed to explore the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Hispanic parents in Maricopa County toward the HPV vaccine in efforts to identify barriers to immunization and create future implications for practice. Findings were consistent with previous literature: Hispanic parents exhibited suboptimal knowledge regarding HPV and HPV vaccination. Specific opportunities for education include the etiology, transmission and health consequences of HPV. Despite many areas for education, the majority of Hispanic parents indicated they would follow their health providers' recommendation on vaccination.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectHPVen
dc.subjectHPV vaccinationen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectHispanic parentsen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBerg, Judith A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberPacheco, Christy L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGoldsmith, Melissa M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBerg, Judith A.en
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