FAST TRACK TO FAT: THE EFFECTS OF FAST FOOD ADVERTISING ON CHILDHOOD OBESITY AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612824
Title:
FAST TRACK TO FAT: THE EFFECTS OF FAST FOOD ADVERTISING ON CHILDHOOD OBESITY AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH
Author:
DASGUPTA, SHRUTI RIA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fast food marketing campaigns target children as young as 3 years old with the use of appealing images, TV advertising, toys, and play areas. As children grow older, peer pressure and social media advertising become the typical methods of drawing them in. Psychologically, it has been shown that brand imprinting and the “mere exposure” effect greatly contribute to the effectiveness of fast food advertising, and that the earlier children are exposed to this advertising, the more potent the effects. The consequences of fast food’s popularity include a pronounced increase in childhood obesity as well as poor cardiovascular health from a young age. The high-calorie, low-nutrient food is spiked with unnecessary sodium, sugars and fats, all of which lead to poor health outcomes for children. However, the prevalence of healthier choices on menus and increased parental concern are some of the positive responses to this health epidemic.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cohen, Zoe

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFAST TRACK TO FAT: THE EFFECTS OF FAST FOOD ADVERTISING ON CHILDHOOD OBESITY AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTHen_US
dc.creatorDASGUPTA, SHRUTI RIAen
dc.contributor.authorDASGUPTA, SHRUTI RIAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractFast food marketing campaigns target children as young as 3 years old with the use of appealing images, TV advertising, toys, and play areas. As children grow older, peer pressure and social media advertising become the typical methods of drawing them in. Psychologically, it has been shown that brand imprinting and the “mere exposure” effect greatly contribute to the effectiveness of fast food advertising, and that the earlier children are exposed to this advertising, the more potent the effects. The consequences of fast food’s popularity include a pronounced increase in childhood obesity as well as poor cardiovascular health from a young age. The high-calorie, low-nutrient food is spiked with unnecessary sodium, sugars and fats, all of which lead to poor health outcomes for children. However, the prevalence of healthier choices on menus and increased parental concern are some of the positive responses to this health epidemic.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCohen, Zoeen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.