Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612644
Title:
MATERNAL GENDER VALUES AND CHILD GENDER SOCIALIZATION
Author:
BLACKEY, AYANA CAITLIN
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study looked at the correlations between mother’s feminism values, their attitudes toward their child’s engagement in gender atypical play, and self-reported parenting behaviors. Sixty-six mothers of six to nine-year-old children participated in the study, with 63 completing an online questionnaire and three completing the questionnaire as well as an in-person interview with their child. Three questions guided the research: 1) Are mother’s feminism values related to their attitudes toward children’s gender expression and parenting behaviors related to gender? 2) Does child’s gender impact mother’s acceptance of gender atypical play and parenting behaviors surrounding children’s individual gender expression? 3) Are mothers’ values regarding acceptance of gender atypical behavior reflected in their self-reported parenting behaviors? Overall, it was expected that more traditional mothers and mothers of sons would report less acceptance of gender atypical play. The results revealed that mothers’ feminism values were correlated to their acceptance of gender atypical behaviors, supporting the hypothesis that more traditional mothers are less accepting of gender atypical behavior. Mothers’ self-reported parenting behaviors revealed stronger trends toward supporting gender typical play in sons than in daughters, supporting the hypothesis that mothers may be less accepting of gender atypical play in sons than daughters.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Family Studies and Human Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnett, Melissa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMATERNAL GENDER VALUES AND CHILD GENDER SOCIALIZATIONen_US
dc.creatorBLACKEY, AYANA CAITLINen
dc.contributor.authorBLACKEY, AYANA CAITLINen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis study looked at the correlations between mother’s feminism values, their attitudes toward their child’s engagement in gender atypical play, and self-reported parenting behaviors. Sixty-six mothers of six to nine-year-old children participated in the study, with 63 completing an online questionnaire and three completing the questionnaire as well as an in-person interview with their child. Three questions guided the research: 1) Are mother’s feminism values related to their attitudes toward children’s gender expression and parenting behaviors related to gender? 2) Does child’s gender impact mother’s acceptance of gender atypical play and parenting behaviors surrounding children’s individual gender expression? 3) Are mothers’ values regarding acceptance of gender atypical behavior reflected in their self-reported parenting behaviors? Overall, it was expected that more traditional mothers and mothers of sons would report less acceptance of gender atypical play. The results revealed that mothers’ feminism values were correlated to their acceptance of gender atypical behaviors, supporting the hypothesis that more traditional mothers are less accepting of gender atypical behavior. Mothers’ self-reported parenting behaviors revealed stronger trends toward supporting gender typical play in sons than in daughters, supporting the hypothesis that mothers may be less accepting of gender atypical play in sons than daughters.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily Studies and Human Developmenten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBarnett, Melissaen
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