DESEGREGATION FUNDS IN PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMS: WHY FUNDING BASED ON DIVERSITY IS STILL CRUCIAL FOR MODERN DAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN ARIZONA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612638
Title:
DESEGREGATION FUNDS IN PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMS: WHY FUNDING BASED ON DIVERSITY IS STILL CRUCIAL FOR MODERN DAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN ARIZONA
Author:
CAMPAS, SERENA CHRISTINE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled that schools could no longer separate students based on ethnicity. Separate but equal could no longer be the standard, and schools were required to integrate. 60 years later, there are still school districts that are under court-order to fund programs that foster diversity. The money used to pay for these programs are called desegregation funds. In Arizona, desegregation funds are a point of contention. There is a bill making its way through the Arizona legislature that, if passed, will phase out desegregation funds over the next ten years. In this thesis, I begin with a brief history of racial inequality within education and continue with an explanation of how Arizona’s desegregation funds are distributed and the controversy surrounding them. The thesis concludes with a personal analysis of the current state of Arizona’s funding issues.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Philosophy, Politics, Economics, and Law
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dovi, Suzanne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDESEGREGATION FUNDS IN PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMS: WHY FUNDING BASED ON DIVERSITY IS STILL CRUCIAL FOR MODERN DAY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN ARIZONAen_US
dc.creatorCAMPAS, SERENA CHRISTINEen
dc.contributor.authorCAMPAS, SERENA CHRISTINEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn 1954, the Supreme Court ruled that schools could no longer separate students based on ethnicity. Separate but equal could no longer be the standard, and schools were required to integrate. 60 years later, there are still school districts that are under court-order to fund programs that foster diversity. The money used to pay for these programs are called desegregation funds. In Arizona, desegregation funds are a point of contention. There is a bill making its way through the Arizona legislature that, if passed, will phase out desegregation funds over the next ten years. In this thesis, I begin with a brief history of racial inequality within education and continue with an explanation of how Arizona’s desegregation funds are distributed and the controversy surrounding them. The thesis concludes with a personal analysis of the current state of Arizona’s funding issues.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy, Politics, Economics, and Lawen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorDovi, Suzanneen
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