CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS IN JUDICIAL ELECTIONS: SEPARATING MONEY FROM THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612635
Title:
CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS IN JUDICIAL ELECTIONS: SEPARATING MONEY FROM THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS
Author:
CLUBB, JACOB RILEY
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis examines campaign contributions in judicial elections. Increasing campaign costs have created a perception that judges’ decisions may be biased by the contributions they receive. Regardless of actual bias, perceived bias is enough to warrant concern because it threatens the legitimacy of the judiciary. Though money presents a problem for the judiciary, elections serve as a beneficial method of selecting judges. Additionally, money is an important aspect in elections and cannot simply be eliminated. Publicly funded elections have been proposed to counteract the problem; however, the findings in this thesis demonstrate that they are no longer a viable option. Recent court cases and a lack of funding have made publicly funded elections unworkable. Instead, this paper proposes a system of judicial disqualification. Disqualifying judges who have a perceived bias due to contributions eliminates the threat to legitimacy.The proposal also takes this decision out of the judge’s hands and allows an independent panel to decide possible bias. The paper demonstrates the ability of a disqualification system to eliminate the negative effects of contributions without harming the positives associated with elections.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Westerland, Chad

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS IN JUDICIAL ELECTIONS: SEPARATING MONEY FROM THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESSen_US
dc.creatorCLUBB, JACOB RILEYen
dc.contributor.authorCLUBB, JACOB RILEYen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines campaign contributions in judicial elections. Increasing campaign costs have created a perception that judges’ decisions may be biased by the contributions they receive. Regardless of actual bias, perceived bias is enough to warrant concern because it threatens the legitimacy of the judiciary. Though money presents a problem for the judiciary, elections serve as a beneficial method of selecting judges. Additionally, money is an important aspect in elections and cannot simply be eliminated. Publicly funded elections have been proposed to counteract the problem; however, the findings in this thesis demonstrate that they are no longer a viable option. Recent court cases and a lack of funding have made publicly funded elections unworkable. Instead, this paper proposes a system of judicial disqualification. Disqualifying judges who have a perceived bias due to contributions eliminates the threat to legitimacy.The proposal also takes this decision out of the judge’s hands and allows an independent panel to decide possible bias. The paper demonstrates the ability of a disqualification system to eliminate the negative effects of contributions without harming the positives associated with elections.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWesterland, Chaden
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