Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612623
Title:
ISIL AND THE ILLEGAL ANTIQUITIES TRADE
Author:
BUNYARD, KATRINA LEE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis examines the involvement of the terrorist organization the Islamic State (ISIL) in the global illegal antiquities trade. Specifically, it focuses on its ideology and organization, as well the impact of illegal antiquities on global markets. I argue that ISIL’s professed ideology is primarily for propaganda purposes and its public and that they are regular participants in a global, fluid antiquities trade network. This allows for looted antiquities to develop a “legitimate” provenance, eventually permeate legitimate markets and accounts for the perceived lack of Syrian antiquities on the market currently.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Romano, Irene Bald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleISIL AND THE ILLEGAL ANTIQUITIES TRADEen_US
dc.creatorBUNYARD, KATRINA LEEen
dc.contributor.authorBUNYARD, KATRINA LEEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the involvement of the terrorist organization the Islamic State (ISIL) in the global illegal antiquities trade. Specifically, it focuses on its ideology and organization, as well the impact of illegal antiquities on global markets. I argue that ISIL’s professed ideology is primarily for propaganda purposes and its public and that they are regular participants in a global, fluid antiquities trade network. This allows for looted antiquities to develop a “legitimate” provenance, eventually permeate legitimate markets and accounts for the perceived lack of Syrian antiquities on the market currently.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRomano, Irene Balden
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